A comparison of load-velocity and load-power relationships between well-trained young and middle-aged males during three popular resistance exercises

John F. T. Fernandes, Kevin L. Lamb, Craig Twist

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal Article

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined the load-velocity and load-power relationships among 20 young (age 21.0 ± 1.6 y) and 20 middle-aged (age 42.6 ± 6.7 y) resistance trained males. Participants performed three repetitions of bench press, squat and bent-over-row across a range of loads corresponding to 20 to 80% of one repetition maximum (1RM). Analysis revealed effects (P <0.05) of group and load x group on barbell velocity for all three exercises, and interaction effects on power for squat and bent-over-row (P <0.05). For bench press and bent-over-row, the young group produced higher barbell velocities, with the magnitude of the differences decreasing as load increased (ES; effect size 0.0 to 1.7 and 1.0 to 2.0, respectively). Squat velocity was higher in the young group than the middle-aged group (ES 1.0 to 1.7) across all loads, as was power for each exercise (ES 1.0 to 2.3). For all three exercises, both velocity and 1RM were correlated with optimal power in the middle-aged group (r = .613 to .825, P <0.05), but only 1RM was correlated with optimal power (r = .708 to .867, P <0.05) in the young group. These findings indicate that despite their resistance training, middle-aged males were unable to achieve velocities at low external loads and power outputs as high as the young males across a range of external resistances. Moreover, the strong correlations between 1RM and velocity with optimal power suggest that middle-aged males would benefit from training methods which maximise these adaptations.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1440-1447
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Strength and Conditioning Research
Volume32
Issue number5
Early online date5 May 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2018
Externally publishedYes

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Exercise
Resistance Training

Keywords

  • Adaptation, Physiological
  • Adolescent
  • Adult
  • Animals
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Muscle Strength/physiology
  • Muscle, Skeletal/physiology
  • Resistance Training/methods
  • Sheep
  • Young Adult

Cite this

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title = "A comparison of load-velocity and load-power relationships between well-trained young and middle-aged males during three popular resistance exercises",
abstract = "This study examined the load-velocity and load-power relationships among 20 young (age 21.0 ± 1.6 y) and 20 middle-aged (age 42.6 ± 6.7 y) resistance trained males. Participants performed three repetitions of bench press, squat and bent-over-row across a range of loads corresponding to 20 to 80{\%} of one repetition maximum (1RM). Analysis revealed effects (P <0.05) of group and load x group on barbell velocity for all three exercises, and interaction effects on power for squat and bent-over-row (P <0.05). For bench press and bent-over-row, the young group produced higher barbell velocities, with the magnitude of the differences decreasing as load increased (ES; effect size 0.0 to 1.7 and 1.0 to 2.0, respectively). Squat velocity was higher in the young group than the middle-aged group (ES 1.0 to 1.7) across all loads, as was power for each exercise (ES 1.0 to 2.3). For all three exercises, both velocity and 1RM were correlated with optimal power in the middle-aged group (r = .613 to .825, P <0.05), but only 1RM was correlated with optimal power (r = .708 to .867, P <0.05) in the young group. These findings indicate that despite their resistance training, middle-aged males were unable to achieve velocities at low external loads and power outputs as high as the young males across a range of external resistances. Moreover, the strong correlations between 1RM and velocity with optimal power suggest that middle-aged males would benefit from training methods which maximise these adaptations.",
keywords = "Adaptation, Physiological, Adolescent, Adult, Animals, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Muscle Strength/physiology, Muscle, Skeletal/physiology, Resistance Training/methods, Sheep, Young Adult",
author = "Fernandes, {John F. T.} and Lamb, {Kevin L.} and Craig Twist",
year = "2018",
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language = "English",
volume = "32",
pages = "1440--1447",
journal = "Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research",
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T1 - A comparison of load-velocity and load-power relationships between well-trained young and middle-aged males during three popular resistance exercises

AU - Fernandes, John F. T.

AU - Lamb, Kevin L.

AU - Twist, Craig

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N2 - This study examined the load-velocity and load-power relationships among 20 young (age 21.0 ± 1.6 y) and 20 middle-aged (age 42.6 ± 6.7 y) resistance trained males. Participants performed three repetitions of bench press, squat and bent-over-row across a range of loads corresponding to 20 to 80% of one repetition maximum (1RM). Analysis revealed effects (P <0.05) of group and load x group on barbell velocity for all three exercises, and interaction effects on power for squat and bent-over-row (P <0.05). For bench press and bent-over-row, the young group produced higher barbell velocities, with the magnitude of the differences decreasing as load increased (ES; effect size 0.0 to 1.7 and 1.0 to 2.0, respectively). Squat velocity was higher in the young group than the middle-aged group (ES 1.0 to 1.7) across all loads, as was power for each exercise (ES 1.0 to 2.3). For all three exercises, both velocity and 1RM were correlated with optimal power in the middle-aged group (r = .613 to .825, P <0.05), but only 1RM was correlated with optimal power (r = .708 to .867, P <0.05) in the young group. These findings indicate that despite their resistance training, middle-aged males were unable to achieve velocities at low external loads and power outputs as high as the young males across a range of external resistances. Moreover, the strong correlations between 1RM and velocity with optimal power suggest that middle-aged males would benefit from training methods which maximise these adaptations.

AB - This study examined the load-velocity and load-power relationships among 20 young (age 21.0 ± 1.6 y) and 20 middle-aged (age 42.6 ± 6.7 y) resistance trained males. Participants performed three repetitions of bench press, squat and bent-over-row across a range of loads corresponding to 20 to 80% of one repetition maximum (1RM). Analysis revealed effects (P <0.05) of group and load x group on barbell velocity for all three exercises, and interaction effects on power for squat and bent-over-row (P <0.05). For bench press and bent-over-row, the young group produced higher barbell velocities, with the magnitude of the differences decreasing as load increased (ES; effect size 0.0 to 1.7 and 1.0 to 2.0, respectively). Squat velocity was higher in the young group than the middle-aged group (ES 1.0 to 1.7) across all loads, as was power for each exercise (ES 1.0 to 2.3). For all three exercises, both velocity and 1RM were correlated with optimal power in the middle-aged group (r = .613 to .825, P <0.05), but only 1RM was correlated with optimal power (r = .708 to .867, P <0.05) in the young group. These findings indicate that despite their resistance training, middle-aged males were unable to achieve velocities at low external loads and power outputs as high as the young males across a range of external resistances. Moreover, the strong correlations between 1RM and velocity with optimal power suggest that middle-aged males would benefit from training methods which maximise these adaptations.

KW - Adaptation, Physiological

KW - Adolescent

KW - Adult

KW - Animals

KW - Humans

KW - Male

KW - Middle Aged

KW - Muscle Strength/physiology

KW - Muscle, Skeletal/physiology

KW - Resistance Training/methods

KW - Sheep

KW - Young Adult

U2 - 10.1519/JSC.0000000000001986

DO - 10.1519/JSC.0000000000001986

M3 - Journal Article

C2 - 28486338

VL - 32

SP - 1440

EP - 1447

JO - Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research

JF - Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research

SN - 1064-8011

IS - 5

ER -