A meta-analysis of plyometric training in female youth: its efficacy and shortcomings in the literature

Jason Moran, C. C. T. Clark, Rodrigo Ramírez-Campillo, Michael J. Davies, Ben Drury

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Abstract

This meta-analysis characterised female youths’ adaptability to plyometric training (PT). A second objective was to highlight the limitations of the body of literature with a view to informing future research. Fourteen studies were included in the final analysis. The effect size (ES = Hedges’ g) for the main effect of vertical jump performance was ‘small’. (ES = 0.57, 95% confidence interval: 0.21, 0.93). Effect sizes were larger in younger (< 15 yrs; ES = 0.78 [0.25, 1.30] vs. 0.31 [-0.18, 0.80]), shorter (<163cm; ES = 1.03 [0.38, 1.68] vs. 0.25 [-0.20, 0.70]) and lighter (<54kg; ES = 1.14 [0.39, 1.89] vs. 0.26 [-0.15, 0.67]) participants. Programing variables seemed to influence adaptive responses with larger effects in interventions which were longer (8 weeks; ES = 1.04 [0.35, 1.72] vs. 0.24 [-0.11, 0.59]), had greater weekly training frequency (>2; ES = 1.22 [0.18, 2.25] vs. 0.37 [0.02, 0.71]) and whose sessions were of longer duration (≥30mins ES = 1.16 [0.14, 2.17] vs. 0.33 [0.03, 0.63]). More than 16 sessions per program (0.85 [0.18, 1.51]) was more effective than exactly 16 sessions (0.46 [0.08, 0.84]) which, in turn, was more effective than less than 16 (0.37 [-0.44, 1.17]). These findings can inform the prescription of PT in female youth.
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Strength and Conditioning Research
Early online date26 Jul 2018
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 26 Jul 2018

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Plyometric Exercise
Meta-Analysis
Prescriptions
Confidence Intervals

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@article{b6ab55f82f6e4bd09291daae15651b6d,
title = "A meta-analysis of plyometric training in female youth: its efficacy and shortcomings in the literature",
abstract = "This meta-analysis characterised female youths’ adaptability to plyometric training (PT). A second objective was to highlight the limitations of the body of literature with a view to informing future research. Fourteen studies were included in the final analysis. The effect size (ES = Hedges’ g) for the main effect of vertical jump performance was ‘small’. (ES = 0.57, 95{\%} confidence interval: 0.21, 0.93). Effect sizes were larger in younger (< 15 yrs; ES = 0.78 [0.25, 1.30] vs. 0.31 [-0.18, 0.80]), shorter (<163cm; ES = 1.03 [0.38, 1.68] vs. 0.25 [-0.20, 0.70]) and lighter (<54kg; ES = 1.14 [0.39, 1.89] vs. 0.26 [-0.15, 0.67]) participants. Programing variables seemed to influence adaptive responses with larger effects in interventions which were longer (8 weeks; ES = 1.04 [0.35, 1.72] vs. 0.24 [-0.11, 0.59]), had greater weekly training frequency (>2; ES = 1.22 [0.18, 2.25] vs. 0.37 [0.02, 0.71]) and whose sessions were of longer duration (≥30mins ES = 1.16 [0.14, 2.17] vs. 0.33 [0.03, 0.63]). More than 16 sessions per program (0.85 [0.18, 1.51]) was more effective than exactly 16 sessions (0.46 [0.08, 0.84]) which, in turn, was more effective than less than 16 (0.37 [-0.44, 1.17]). These findings can inform the prescription of PT in female youth.",
author = "Jason Moran and Clark, {C. C. T.} and Rodrigo Ram{\'i}rez-Campillo and Davies, {Michael J.} and Ben Drury",
year = "2018",
month = "7",
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language = "English",
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A meta-analysis of plyometric training in female youth: its efficacy and shortcomings in the literature. / Moran, Jason; Clark, C. C. T.; Ramírez-Campillo, Rodrigo; Davies, Michael J.; Drury, Ben.

In: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 26.07.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal Article

TY - JOUR

T1 - A meta-analysis of plyometric training in female youth: its efficacy and shortcomings in the literature

AU - Moran, Jason

AU - Clark, C. C. T.

AU - Ramírez-Campillo, Rodrigo

AU - Davies, Michael J.

AU - Drury, Ben

PY - 2018/7/26

Y1 - 2018/7/26

N2 - This meta-analysis characterised female youths’ adaptability to plyometric training (PT). A second objective was to highlight the limitations of the body of literature with a view to informing future research. Fourteen studies were included in the final analysis. The effect size (ES = Hedges’ g) for the main effect of vertical jump performance was ‘small’. (ES = 0.57, 95% confidence interval: 0.21, 0.93). Effect sizes were larger in younger (< 15 yrs; ES = 0.78 [0.25, 1.30] vs. 0.31 [-0.18, 0.80]), shorter (<163cm; ES = 1.03 [0.38, 1.68] vs. 0.25 [-0.20, 0.70]) and lighter (<54kg; ES = 1.14 [0.39, 1.89] vs. 0.26 [-0.15, 0.67]) participants. Programing variables seemed to influence adaptive responses with larger effects in interventions which were longer (8 weeks; ES = 1.04 [0.35, 1.72] vs. 0.24 [-0.11, 0.59]), had greater weekly training frequency (>2; ES = 1.22 [0.18, 2.25] vs. 0.37 [0.02, 0.71]) and whose sessions were of longer duration (≥30mins ES = 1.16 [0.14, 2.17] vs. 0.33 [0.03, 0.63]). More than 16 sessions per program (0.85 [0.18, 1.51]) was more effective than exactly 16 sessions (0.46 [0.08, 0.84]) which, in turn, was more effective than less than 16 (0.37 [-0.44, 1.17]). These findings can inform the prescription of PT in female youth.

AB - This meta-analysis characterised female youths’ adaptability to plyometric training (PT). A second objective was to highlight the limitations of the body of literature with a view to informing future research. Fourteen studies were included in the final analysis. The effect size (ES = Hedges’ g) for the main effect of vertical jump performance was ‘small’. (ES = 0.57, 95% confidence interval: 0.21, 0.93). Effect sizes were larger in younger (< 15 yrs; ES = 0.78 [0.25, 1.30] vs. 0.31 [-0.18, 0.80]), shorter (<163cm; ES = 1.03 [0.38, 1.68] vs. 0.25 [-0.20, 0.70]) and lighter (<54kg; ES = 1.14 [0.39, 1.89] vs. 0.26 [-0.15, 0.67]) participants. Programing variables seemed to influence adaptive responses with larger effects in interventions which were longer (8 weeks; ES = 1.04 [0.35, 1.72] vs. 0.24 [-0.11, 0.59]), had greater weekly training frequency (>2; ES = 1.22 [0.18, 2.25] vs. 0.37 [0.02, 0.71]) and whose sessions were of longer duration (≥30mins ES = 1.16 [0.14, 2.17] vs. 0.33 [0.03, 0.63]). More than 16 sessions per program (0.85 [0.18, 1.51]) was more effective than exactly 16 sessions (0.46 [0.08, 0.84]) which, in turn, was more effective than less than 16 (0.37 [-0.44, 1.17]). These findings can inform the prescription of PT in female youth.

U2 - 10.1519/JSC.0000000000002768

DO - 10.1519/JSC.0000000000002768

M3 - Journal Article

JO - Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research

JF - Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research

SN - 1064-8011

ER -