A Meta-Analysis of Resistance Training in Female Youth: Its Effect on Muscular Strength, and Shortcomings in the Literature

Jason Moran, Gavin R. H. Sandercock, Rodrigo Ramirez-Campillo, C. C. T. Clark, John Fernandes, Ben Drury

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal Article

8 Citations (Scopus)
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Abstract


Background

Resistance training is an effective way to enhance strength in female youth but, to date, no researcher has meta-analysed its effect on muscular strength in that population.


Objectives

This meta-analysis characterised female youths’ adaptability to resistance training (RT). A second objective was to highlight the limitations of the body of literature with a view to informing future research.


Data Sources

Google Scholar, PubMed, Web of Science.


Study Eligibility Criteria

Resistance training interventions in healthy females with a mean age between 8 and 18 years. Programmes of between 4 and 16 weeks’ duration that included a control group.


Study Appraisal and Synthesis Methods

The inverse-variance random effects model for meta-analyses was used because it allocates a proportionate weight to trials based on the size of their individual standard errors and facilitates analysis whilst accounting for heterogeneity across studies. Effect sizes, calculated from a measure of muscular strength, are represented by the standardised mean difference and are presented alongside 95% confidence intervals.


Results

The magnitude of the main effect was ‘small’ (0.54, 95% confidence interval: 0.23–0.85). Effect sizes were larger in older (> 15 years; ES = 0.72 [0.23–1.21] vs. 0.38 [− 0.02–0.79]), taller (> 163 cm; ES = 0.67 [0.20–1.13] vs. 0.55 [0.08–1.02]) and heavier (< 54 kg; ES = 0.67 [0.30–1.03] vs. 0.53 [− 0.00–1.06]) participants.


Conclusions and Implications of Key Findings

Resistance training is effective in female youth. These findings can be used to inform the prescription of RT in female youth.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1661-1671
Number of pages11
JournalSports Medicine
Volume48
Issue number7
Early online date18 Apr 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2018

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Resistance Training
Meta-Analysis
Confidence Intervals
PubMed
Prescriptions
Research Personnel
Weights and Measures
Control Groups
Population

Cite this

Moran, Jason ; Sandercock, Gavin R. H. ; Ramirez-Campillo, Rodrigo ; Clark, C. C. T. ; Fernandes, John ; Drury, Ben. / A Meta-Analysis of Resistance Training in Female Youth: Its Effect on Muscular Strength, and Shortcomings in the Literature. In: Sports Medicine. 2018 ; Vol. 48, No. 7. pp. 1661-1671.
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abstract = "BackgroundResistance training is an effective way to enhance strength in female youth but, to date, no researcher has meta-analysed its effect on muscular strength in that population.ObjectivesThis meta-analysis characterised female youths’ adaptability to resistance training (RT). A second objective was to highlight the limitations of the body of literature with a view to informing future research.Data SourcesGoogle Scholar, PubMed, Web of Science.Study Eligibility CriteriaResistance training interventions in healthy females with a mean age between 8 and 18 years. Programmes of between 4 and 16 weeks’ duration that included a control group.Study Appraisal and Synthesis MethodsThe inverse-variance random effects model for meta-analyses was used because it allocates a proportionate weight to trials based on the size of their individual standard errors and facilitates analysis whilst accounting for heterogeneity across studies. Effect sizes, calculated from a measure of muscular strength, are represented by the standardised mean difference and are presented alongside 95{\%} confidence intervals.ResultsThe magnitude of the main effect was ‘small’ (0.54, 95{\%} confidence interval: 0.23–0.85). Effect sizes were larger in older (> 15 years; ES = 0.72 [0.23–1.21] vs. 0.38 [− 0.02–0.79]), taller (> 163 cm; ES = 0.67 [0.20–1.13] vs. 0.55 [0.08–1.02]) and heavier (< 54 kg; ES = 0.67 [0.30–1.03] vs. 0.53 [− 0.00–1.06]) participants.Conclusions and Implications of Key FindingsResistance training is effective in female youth. These findings can be used to inform the prescription of RT in female youth.",
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A Meta-Analysis of Resistance Training in Female Youth: Its Effect on Muscular Strength, and Shortcomings in the Literature. / Moran, Jason; Sandercock, Gavin R. H.; Ramirez-Campillo, Rodrigo; Clark, C. C. T.; Fernandes, John; Drury, Ben.

In: Sports Medicine, Vol. 48, No. 7, 01.07.2018, p. 1661-1671.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal Article

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AU - Fernandes, John

AU - Drury, Ben

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N2 - BackgroundResistance training is an effective way to enhance strength in female youth but, to date, no researcher has meta-analysed its effect on muscular strength in that population.ObjectivesThis meta-analysis characterised female youths’ adaptability to resistance training (RT). A second objective was to highlight the limitations of the body of literature with a view to informing future research.Data SourcesGoogle Scholar, PubMed, Web of Science.Study Eligibility CriteriaResistance training interventions in healthy females with a mean age between 8 and 18 years. Programmes of between 4 and 16 weeks’ duration that included a control group.Study Appraisal and Synthesis MethodsThe inverse-variance random effects model for meta-analyses was used because it allocates a proportionate weight to trials based on the size of their individual standard errors and facilitates analysis whilst accounting for heterogeneity across studies. Effect sizes, calculated from a measure of muscular strength, are represented by the standardised mean difference and are presented alongside 95% confidence intervals.ResultsThe magnitude of the main effect was ‘small’ (0.54, 95% confidence interval: 0.23–0.85). Effect sizes were larger in older (> 15 years; ES = 0.72 [0.23–1.21] vs. 0.38 [− 0.02–0.79]), taller (> 163 cm; ES = 0.67 [0.20–1.13] vs. 0.55 [0.08–1.02]) and heavier (< 54 kg; ES = 0.67 [0.30–1.03] vs. 0.53 [− 0.00–1.06]) participants.Conclusions and Implications of Key FindingsResistance training is effective in female youth. These findings can be used to inform the prescription of RT in female youth.

AB - BackgroundResistance training is an effective way to enhance strength in female youth but, to date, no researcher has meta-analysed its effect on muscular strength in that population.ObjectivesThis meta-analysis characterised female youths’ adaptability to resistance training (RT). A second objective was to highlight the limitations of the body of literature with a view to informing future research.Data SourcesGoogle Scholar, PubMed, Web of Science.Study Eligibility CriteriaResistance training interventions in healthy females with a mean age between 8 and 18 years. Programmes of between 4 and 16 weeks’ duration that included a control group.Study Appraisal and Synthesis MethodsThe inverse-variance random effects model for meta-analyses was used because it allocates a proportionate weight to trials based on the size of their individual standard errors and facilitates analysis whilst accounting for heterogeneity across studies. Effect sizes, calculated from a measure of muscular strength, are represented by the standardised mean difference and are presented alongside 95% confidence intervals.ResultsThe magnitude of the main effect was ‘small’ (0.54, 95% confidence interval: 0.23–0.85). Effect sizes were larger in older (> 15 years; ES = 0.72 [0.23–1.21] vs. 0.38 [− 0.02–0.79]), taller (> 163 cm; ES = 0.67 [0.20–1.13] vs. 0.55 [0.08–1.02]) and heavier (< 54 kg; ES = 0.67 [0.30–1.03] vs. 0.53 [− 0.00–1.06]) participants.Conclusions and Implications of Key FindingsResistance training is effective in female youth. These findings can be used to inform the prescription of RT in female youth.

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SN - 0112-1642

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