An Increase in Fat-Free Mass is Associated with Higher Appetite and Energy Intake in Older Adults: A Randomised Control Trial

Kelsie Olivia Johnson, Adrian Holliday, Nathan Mistry, Andrew Cunniffe, Kieran Howard, Nicholas Stanger, Lauren L O'Mahoney, Jamie Matu, Theocharis Ispoglou

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal Articlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)
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Abstract

Cross-sectional studies in younger adults have demonstrated a positive association between energy intake (EI) and fat-free mass (FFM), with this relationship seemingly mediated by resting metabolic rate (RMR). Establishing a causal effect longitudinally would be prudent in older adults suffering from loss of appetite. We investigated the effects of FFM on RMR, appetite and EI in 39 healthy older adults (age: 66 ± 4 years, BMI: 25.1 ± 3.5 kg·m2 ) assigned to either 12-week resistance training + protein supplementation group (RT + PRO) or control group (CON). Body composition, subjective appetite, leptin, insulin, RMR and laboratory-measured ad libitum EI were measured at baseline, weeks 6 and 12 of the intervention, while daily EI at baseline and week 12. FFM (+1.2 kg; p = 0.002), postprandial subjective appetite (+8 mm; p = 0.027), ad libitum EI (+119 kcal; p = 0.012) and daily EI (+133 kcal; p = 0.010) increased from baseline to week 12 in the RT + PRO. RMR, fasted subjective appetite, leptin and insulin concentrations remained unchanged (all p > 0.05). The increases ad libitum EI correlated with increases in FFM (r = 0.527, p = 0.001), with 54% of the change in EI attributed to FFM changes. In conclusion, FFM increases were associated with an increased ad libitum EI and postprandial appetite in older adults.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages22
JournalNutrients
Volume13
Issue number1
Early online date1 Jan 2021
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 1 Jan 2021

Keywords

  • Ageing
  • Appetite
  • Energy intake
  • Fat-free mass
  • Older adults
  • Protein intake
  • Resistance training

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