Analysis of competition stress on the microbial population in the equine hindgut.

    Research output: Contribution to conferencePoster

    Abstract

    The horse is a nonruminant herbivore where fermentation of chyme occurs in the hindgut (cecum and colon). Within this area, there is a dynamic microbial population that serve the host through immune stimulation, energy extraction, detoxification and pathogen exclusion. The impact of stress on this diverse microbial ecosystem has been seen to have an effect on the numbers of microflora that populate this area. This stress could affect health, welfare, and/or performance. Despite this, scientific literature currently provides limited details on the hindgut microflora response to stress. In particular, competition stress which is a regular experience for most performance horses. The aim of this study was to assess if the stress experienced while performing at competition had an effect on the numbers of hindgut microorganisms present within fecal samples. Fecal samples were obtained from 8 horses, aged 6 – 19 (mean = 10.38 ± 1.95), over a 5 day period. All horses participated in a showjumping competition on Day 2 of sampling. Samples were collected 3 times daily. All participants were clinically healthy and no dietary changes or medication had been given in the 2 months prior to sampling. 10-fold serial dilutions were conducted on blood agar. Total bacterial counts were enumerated. The cultured bacteria were identified to species level using biochemical tests. 14 bacteria species were identified over the 5 day sampling period. Decreases in total bacterial numbers occurred within a 24hour period post-competition in total bacterial numbers. A significant difference was identified on total bacterial numbers between baseline values of day 1 and day 5 and between day 3 and day 5 (P<0.05). No significant difference was found on total bacterial numbers between baseline values of day 1 and day 3 (P>0.05). In conclusion, competition stress had a significant impact on bacterial numbers over the 3 day period post-competition. This could suggest that prolonged exposure to competing or competition environments could have a detrimental effect on a horse’s health and performance. Further research is required to establish the impact of these microbial variations on the horse.
    Original languageEnglish
    Publication statusPublished - Aug 2018
    Event69th Annual Meeting of the European Federation of Animal Science - Valamar Resort in Dubrovnik, Dubrovnik, Croatia
    Duration: 27 Aug 201831 Aug 2018
    http://www.eaap2018.org/

    Conference

    Conference69th Annual Meeting of the European Federation of Animal Science
    Abbreviated titleEAAP2018
    CountryCroatia
    CityDubrovnik
    Period27/8/1831/8/18
    Internet address

    Fingerprint

    Horses
    Population
    Bacteria
    Literature
    Herbivory
    Cecum
    Bacterial Load
    Health
    Population Dynamics
    Fermentation
    Agar
    Ecosystem
    Colon
    Research

    Cite this

    Carroll, A. (2018). Analysis of competition stress on the microbial population in the equine hindgut.. Poster session presented at 69th Annual Meeting of the European Federation of Animal Science, Dubrovnik, Croatia.
    Carroll, Aisling. / Analysis of competition stress on the microbial population in the equine hindgut. Poster session presented at 69th Annual Meeting of the European Federation of Animal Science, Dubrovnik, Croatia.
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    title = "Analysis of competition stress on the microbial population in the equine hindgut.",
    abstract = "The horse is a nonruminant herbivore where fermentation of chyme occurs in the hindgut (cecum and colon). Within this area, there is a dynamic microbial population that serve the host through immune stimulation, energy extraction, detoxification and pathogen exclusion. The impact of stress on this diverse microbial ecosystem has been seen to have an effect on the numbers of microflora that populate this area. This stress could affect health, welfare, and/or performance. Despite this, scientific literature currently provides limited details on the hindgut microflora response to stress. In particular, competition stress which is a regular experience for most performance horses. The aim of this study was to assess if the stress experienced while performing at competition had an effect on the numbers of hindgut microorganisms present within fecal samples. Fecal samples were obtained from 8 horses, aged 6 – 19 (mean = 10.38 ± 1.95), over a 5 day period. All horses participated in a showjumping competition on Day 2 of sampling. Samples were collected 3 times daily. All participants were clinically healthy and no dietary changes or medication had been given in the 2 months prior to sampling. 10-fold serial dilutions were conducted on blood agar. Total bacterial counts were enumerated. The cultured bacteria were identified to species level using biochemical tests. 14 bacteria species were identified over the 5 day sampling period. Decreases in total bacterial numbers occurred within a 24hour period post-competition in total bacterial numbers. A significant difference was identified on total bacterial numbers between baseline values of day 1 and day 5 and between day 3 and day 5 (P<0.05). No significant difference was found on total bacterial numbers between baseline values of day 1 and day 3 (P>0.05). In conclusion, competition stress had a significant impact on bacterial numbers over the 3 day period post-competition. This could suggest that prolonged exposure to competing or competition environments could have a detrimental effect on a horse’s health and performance. Further research is required to establish the impact of these microbial variations on the horse.",
    author = "Aisling Carroll",
    year = "2018",
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    language = "English",
    note = "69th Annual Meeting of the European Federation of Animal Science, EAAP2018 ; Conference date: 27-08-2018 Through 31-08-2018",
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    Carroll, A 2018, 'Analysis of competition stress on the microbial population in the equine hindgut.' 69th Annual Meeting of the European Federation of Animal Science, Dubrovnik, Croatia, 27/8/18 - 31/8/18, .

    Analysis of competition stress on the microbial population in the equine hindgut. / Carroll, Aisling.

    2018. Poster session presented at 69th Annual Meeting of the European Federation of Animal Science, Dubrovnik, Croatia.

    Research output: Contribution to conferencePoster

    TY - CONF

    T1 - Analysis of competition stress on the microbial population in the equine hindgut.

    AU - Carroll, Aisling

    PY - 2018/8

    Y1 - 2018/8

    N2 - The horse is a nonruminant herbivore where fermentation of chyme occurs in the hindgut (cecum and colon). Within this area, there is a dynamic microbial population that serve the host through immune stimulation, energy extraction, detoxification and pathogen exclusion. The impact of stress on this diverse microbial ecosystem has been seen to have an effect on the numbers of microflora that populate this area. This stress could affect health, welfare, and/or performance. Despite this, scientific literature currently provides limited details on the hindgut microflora response to stress. In particular, competition stress which is a regular experience for most performance horses. The aim of this study was to assess if the stress experienced while performing at competition had an effect on the numbers of hindgut microorganisms present within fecal samples. Fecal samples were obtained from 8 horses, aged 6 – 19 (mean = 10.38 ± 1.95), over a 5 day period. All horses participated in a showjumping competition on Day 2 of sampling. Samples were collected 3 times daily. All participants were clinically healthy and no dietary changes or medication had been given in the 2 months prior to sampling. 10-fold serial dilutions were conducted on blood agar. Total bacterial counts were enumerated. The cultured bacteria were identified to species level using biochemical tests. 14 bacteria species were identified over the 5 day sampling period. Decreases in total bacterial numbers occurred within a 24hour period post-competition in total bacterial numbers. A significant difference was identified on total bacterial numbers between baseline values of day 1 and day 5 and between day 3 and day 5 (P<0.05). No significant difference was found on total bacterial numbers between baseline values of day 1 and day 3 (P>0.05). In conclusion, competition stress had a significant impact on bacterial numbers over the 3 day period post-competition. This could suggest that prolonged exposure to competing or competition environments could have a detrimental effect on a horse’s health and performance. Further research is required to establish the impact of these microbial variations on the horse.

    AB - The horse is a nonruminant herbivore where fermentation of chyme occurs in the hindgut (cecum and colon). Within this area, there is a dynamic microbial population that serve the host through immune stimulation, energy extraction, detoxification and pathogen exclusion. The impact of stress on this diverse microbial ecosystem has been seen to have an effect on the numbers of microflora that populate this area. This stress could affect health, welfare, and/or performance. Despite this, scientific literature currently provides limited details on the hindgut microflora response to stress. In particular, competition stress which is a regular experience for most performance horses. The aim of this study was to assess if the stress experienced while performing at competition had an effect on the numbers of hindgut microorganisms present within fecal samples. Fecal samples were obtained from 8 horses, aged 6 – 19 (mean = 10.38 ± 1.95), over a 5 day period. All horses participated in a showjumping competition on Day 2 of sampling. Samples were collected 3 times daily. All participants were clinically healthy and no dietary changes or medication had been given in the 2 months prior to sampling. 10-fold serial dilutions were conducted on blood agar. Total bacterial counts were enumerated. The cultured bacteria were identified to species level using biochemical tests. 14 bacteria species were identified over the 5 day sampling period. Decreases in total bacterial numbers occurred within a 24hour period post-competition in total bacterial numbers. A significant difference was identified on total bacterial numbers between baseline values of day 1 and day 5 and between day 3 and day 5 (P<0.05). No significant difference was found on total bacterial numbers between baseline values of day 1 and day 3 (P>0.05). In conclusion, competition stress had a significant impact on bacterial numbers over the 3 day period post-competition. This could suggest that prolonged exposure to competing or competition environments could have a detrimental effect on a horse’s health and performance. Further research is required to establish the impact of these microbial variations on the horse.

    M3 - Poster

    ER -

    Carroll A. Analysis of competition stress on the microbial population in the equine hindgut.. 2018. Poster session presented at 69th Annual Meeting of the European Federation of Animal Science, Dubrovnik, Croatia.