Cognitive bias in the chick anxiety-depression model

Amy L. Salmeto, Kristen A. Hymel, Erika C. Carpenter, Ben O. Brilot, Melissa Bateson, Kenneth J. Sufka

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal Article

80 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cognitive bias is a phenomenon that presents in clinical populations where anxious individuals tend to adopt a more pessimistic-like interpretation of ambiguous aversive stimuli whereas depressed individuals tend to adopt a less optimistic-like interpretation of ambiguous appetitive stimuli. To further validate the chick anxiety-depression model as a neuropsychiatric simulation we sought to quantify this cognitive endophenotype. Chicks exposed to an isolation stressor of 5 m to induce an anxiety-like or 60 m to induce a depressive-like state were then tested in a straight alley maze to a series of morphed ambiguous appetitive (chick silhouette) to aversive (owl silhouette) cues. In non-isolated controls, runway start and goal latencies generally increased as a function of greater amounts of aversive characteristics in the cues. In chicks in the anxiety-like state, runway latencies were increased to aversive ambiguous cues, reflecting more pessimistic-like behavior. In chicks in the depression-like state, runway latencies were increased to both aversive and appetitive ambiguous cues, reflecting more pessimistic-like and less optimistic-like behavior, respectively. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)124-130
Number of pages7
JournalBrain Research
Volume1373
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 10 Feb 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Cues
Anxiety
Depression
Strigiformes
Endophenotypes
Population

Keywords

  • Anxiety
  • Chick
  • Cognitive bias
  • Depression
  • Endophenotype
  • Straight-alley maze

Cite this

Salmeto, A. L., Hymel, K. A., Carpenter, E. C., Brilot, B. O., Bateson, M., & Sufka, K. J. (2011). Cognitive bias in the chick anxiety-depression model. Brain Research, 1373, 124-130. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.brainres.2010.12.007
Salmeto, Amy L. ; Hymel, Kristen A. ; Carpenter, Erika C. ; Brilot, Ben O. ; Bateson, Melissa ; Sufka, Kenneth J. / Cognitive bias in the chick anxiety-depression model. In: Brain Research. 2011 ; Vol. 1373. pp. 124-130.
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Salmeto, AL, Hymel, KA, Carpenter, EC, Brilot, BO, Bateson, M & Sufka, KJ 2011, 'Cognitive bias in the chick anxiety-depression model', Brain Research, vol. 1373, pp. 124-130. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.brainres.2010.12.007

Cognitive bias in the chick anxiety-depression model. / Salmeto, Amy L.; Hymel, Kristen A.; Carpenter, Erika C.; Brilot, Ben O.; Bateson, Melissa; Sufka, Kenneth J.

In: Brain Research, Vol. 1373, 10.02.2011, p. 124-130.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal Article

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AU - Sufka, Kenneth J.

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AB - Cognitive bias is a phenomenon that presents in clinical populations where anxious individuals tend to adopt a more pessimistic-like interpretation of ambiguous aversive stimuli whereas depressed individuals tend to adopt a less optimistic-like interpretation of ambiguous appetitive stimuli. To further validate the chick anxiety-depression model as a neuropsychiatric simulation we sought to quantify this cognitive endophenotype. Chicks exposed to an isolation stressor of 5 m to induce an anxiety-like or 60 m to induce a depressive-like state were then tested in a straight alley maze to a series of morphed ambiguous appetitive (chick silhouette) to aversive (owl silhouette) cues. In non-isolated controls, runway start and goal latencies generally increased as a function of greater amounts of aversive characteristics in the cues. In chicks in the anxiety-like state, runway latencies were increased to aversive ambiguous cues, reflecting more pessimistic-like behavior. In chicks in the depression-like state, runway latencies were increased to both aversive and appetitive ambiguous cues, reflecting more pessimistic-like and less optimistic-like behavior, respectively. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

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Salmeto AL, Hymel KA, Carpenter EC, Brilot BO, Bateson M, Sufka KJ. Cognitive bias in the chick anxiety-depression model. Brain Research. 2011 Feb 10;1373:124-130. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.brainres.2010.12.007