E-mental health and the veterinary profession

James A. Oxley, V. Tamara Montrose, Lori Kogan

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Mental health and well-being have been receiving greater attention within the veterinary profession in recent years. Common mental health–related issues experienced by veterinarians include depression, anxiety, anorexia, mood disorders, alcoholism, and drug-related problems,1 and the suicide rate among United Kingdom veterinarians is 3 times that of the general population.2 The etiology behind the high incidence of suicide among veterinarians is debated but likely multifactorial. Factors that may play a role in suicidal ideation include work-related factors, such as professional isolation, long working hours, high workloads, managerial responsibilities, poor work-life balance, high client expectations, frequent exposure to euthanasia, and the ready accessibility of euthanasia drugs, and personal factors, such as relationship problems and alcohol- and drug-related problems
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)12226-1227
Number of pages2
JournalJournal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Volume250
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 2017

Fingerprint

Health Occupations
mental health
Veterinarians
veterinarians
Mental Health
suicide
Euthanasia
euthanasia
drugs
Suicide
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Suicidal Ideation
work schedules
Anorexia
anxiety
alcohol abuse
emotions
Workload
Mood Disorders
anorexia

Keywords

  • Mental health

Cite this

Oxley, James A. ; Montrose, V. Tamara ; Kogan, Lori. / E-mental health and the veterinary profession. In: Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association. 2017 ; Vol. 250, No. 11. pp. 12226-1227.
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E-mental health and the veterinary profession. / Oxley, James A.; Montrose, V. Tamara; Kogan, Lori.

In: Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, Vol. 250, No. 11, 01.06.2017, p. 12226-1227.

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

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