Effects of a neuromuscular training program on anterior cruciate ligament injury risk factors in youth female basketball players: a pilot study

Carrasco-Huenulef C, Jason Moran

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal Article

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to describe the effects of a neuromuscular training program to reduce injury risk factors (quadriceps dominance; ligament dominance; leg dominance; trunk dominance) linked to anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury in national-level female youth basketball athletes.

METHODS: Before and after training, thirteen participants (age, 16.9±1.5 years) underwent anthropometry measurements, a drop jump screening test to assess knee flexion (quadriceps dominance) and knee valgus (ligament dominance) angle during landing, a single-leg horizontal hop test to assess differences between lower limbs (i.e., leg dominance), and a tuck jump test to assess trunk dominance. Athletes trained for six weeks, on three occasions per week (20-25 minutes per session), performing plyometric, balance, and core-stability drills with a therapist to trainee ratio of 1:1. Magnitude-based inferences were used to quantify the effects of the intervention.

RESULTS: Anthropometry-related variables were not modified after the intervention. Knee flexion and knee valgus in the drop jump test achieved large and likely beneficial increases (ES=1.28) and reductions (ES=1.36), respectively. Leg dominance achieved a large and likely beneficial reduction (ES=1.23). Athletes exhibiting trunk dominance were reduced from nine individuals to five. Of note, all athletes improved knee flexion (increased) and valgus (reduced) angle during jump landing, and leg dominance (reduced).

CONCLUSIONS: All athletes reduced injury risk factors linked to ACL injury after a novel short-term, short-duration and highly supervised neuromuscular training program, which was applied as a replacement to regular low-intensity and warm-up activities.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)137-144
Number of pages8
JournalGazzetta Medica Italiana Archivio per le Scienze Mediche
Volume178
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2019

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Basketball
Athletes
Leg
Knee
Education
Anthropometry
Ligaments
Humulus
Mandrillus
Wounds and Injuries
Lower Extremity
Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries

Cite this

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abstract = "BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to describe the effects of a neuromuscular training program to reduce injury risk factors (quadriceps dominance; ligament dominance; leg dominance; trunk dominance) linked to anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury in national-level female youth basketball athletes.METHODS: Before and after training, thirteen participants (age, 16.9±1.5 years) underwent anthropometry measurements, a drop jump screening test to assess knee flexion (quadriceps dominance) and knee valgus (ligament dominance) angle during landing, a single-leg horizontal hop test to assess differences between lower limbs (i.e., leg dominance), and a tuck jump test to assess trunk dominance. Athletes trained for six weeks, on three occasions per week (20-25 minutes per session), performing plyometric, balance, and core-stability drills with a therapist to trainee ratio of 1:1. Magnitude-based inferences were used to quantify the effects of the intervention.RESULTS: Anthropometry-related variables were not modified after the intervention. Knee flexion and knee valgus in the drop jump test achieved large and likely beneficial increases (ES=1.28) and reductions (ES=1.36), respectively. Leg dominance achieved a large and likely beneficial reduction (ES=1.23). Athletes exhibiting trunk dominance were reduced from nine individuals to five. Of note, all athletes improved knee flexion (increased) and valgus (reduced) angle during jump landing, and leg dominance (reduced).CONCLUSIONS: All athletes reduced injury risk factors linked to ACL injury after a novel short-term, short-duration and highly supervised neuromuscular training program, which was applied as a replacement to regular low-intensity and warm-up activities.",
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Effects of a neuromuscular training program on anterior cruciate ligament injury risk factors in youth female basketball players: a pilot study. / C, Carrasco-Huenulef; Moran, Jason.

In: Gazzetta Medica Italiana Archivio per le Scienze Mediche, Vol. 178, No. 3, 01.03.2019, p. 137-144.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal Article

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JO - Gazzetta Medica Italiana Archivio per le Scienze Mediche

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