Effects of Plyometric Training on Physical Performance of Young Male Soccer Players: Potential Effects of Different Drop Jump Heights

Rodrigo Ramírez-Campillo, Cristian Álvarez, Felipe García Pinillos, Paulo Gentil, Jason Moran, Lucas A. Pereira, Irineu Loturco

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Abstract

Purpose: To compare the effects of plyometric drop jump training against those induced by regular soccer training, and to assess the transference effect coefficient (TEC) of drop-jumps (“trained exercises”) performed from 20- [DJ20] and 40-cm [DJ40] height boxes with respect to different physical qualities (jumping; linear and change of direction speed; kicking; endurance; maximal strength) in youth male soccer players. Methods: Participants were randomly divided into a control group (n=20; age: 13.5±1.9 years) and a drop jump (DJ) training group (n=19; age: 13.2±1.8 years); and trained for 7 weeks. To calculate the TEC between DJ20-DJ40 and the physical tests, the ratio between the “result gain” (effect-size [ES]) in the analyzed physical qualities and the result gain in the trained exercises were calculated. The TECs were only calculated for variables presenting an ES ≥0.2. Results: Significant improvements (ES=0.21-0.46; P < 0.05) were observed in the DJ training group, except in linear sprint performance. The control group improved only maximal strength (ES=0.28). Significant differences were observed in all variables (ES=0.20-0.55; P < 0.05) in favor of the DJ training group, except for maximal strength. Greater TECs were observed for DJ40 (0.58-1.28) than DJ20 (0.55-1.21). Conclusion: Our data suggest that youth players can improve their physical performance through the use of drop jumps. This is the first study that used the TEC to demonstrate the carry-over effect of plyometric training using drop jumps on physical performance of young soccer players.
Original languageEnglish
JournalPediatric Exercise Science
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 1 Dec 2018

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Plyometric Exercise
Soccer
Exercise
Control Groups

Keywords

  • plyometric
  • explosive strength
  • force-velocity
  • maturity
  • football

Cite this

Ramírez-Campillo, R., Álvarez, C., García Pinillos, F., Gentil, P., Moran, J., Pereira, L. A., & Loturco, I. (Accepted/In press). Effects of Plyometric Training on Physical Performance of Young Male Soccer Players: Potential Effects of Different Drop Jump Heights. Pediatric Exercise Science. https://doi.org/10.1123/pes.2018-0207
Ramírez-Campillo, Rodrigo ; Álvarez, Cristian ; García Pinillos, Felipe ; Gentil, Paulo ; Moran, Jason ; Pereira, Lucas A. ; Loturco, Irineu. / Effects of Plyometric Training on Physical Performance of Young Male Soccer Players: Potential Effects of Different Drop Jump Heights. In: Pediatric Exercise Science. 2018.
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title = "Effects of Plyometric Training on Physical Performance of Young Male Soccer Players: Potential Effects of Different Drop Jump Heights",
abstract = "Purpose: To compare the effects of plyometric drop jump training against those induced by regular soccer training, and to assess the transference effect coefficient (TEC) of drop-jumps (“trained exercises”) performed from 20- [DJ20] and 40-cm [DJ40] height boxes with respect to different physical qualities (jumping; linear and change of direction speed; kicking; endurance; maximal strength) in youth male soccer players. Methods: Participants were randomly divided into a control group (n=20; age: 13.5±1.9 years) and a drop jump (DJ) training group (n=19; age: 13.2±1.8 years); and trained for 7 weeks. To calculate the TEC between DJ20-DJ40 and the physical tests, the ratio between the “result gain” (effect-size [ES]) in the analyzed physical qualities and the result gain in the trained exercises were calculated. The TECs were only calculated for variables presenting an ES ≥0.2. Results: Significant improvements (ES=0.21-0.46; P < 0.05) were observed in the DJ training group, except in linear sprint performance. The control group improved only maximal strength (ES=0.28). Significant differences were observed in all variables (ES=0.20-0.55; P < 0.05) in favor of the DJ training group, except for maximal strength. Greater TECs were observed for DJ40 (0.58-1.28) than DJ20 (0.55-1.21). Conclusion: Our data suggest that youth players can improve their physical performance through the use of drop jumps. This is the first study that used the TEC to demonstrate the carry-over effect of plyometric training using drop jumps on physical performance of young soccer players.",
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author = "Rodrigo Ram{\'i}rez-Campillo and Cristian {\'A}lvarez and {Garc{\'i}a Pinillos}, Felipe and Paulo Gentil and Jason Moran and Pereira, {Lucas A.} and Irineu Loturco",
year = "2018",
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language = "English",
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Effects of Plyometric Training on Physical Performance of Young Male Soccer Players: Potential Effects of Different Drop Jump Heights. / Ramírez-Campillo, Rodrigo; Álvarez, Cristian; García Pinillos, Felipe; Gentil, Paulo; Moran, Jason; Pereira, Lucas A.; Loturco, Irineu.

In: Pediatric Exercise Science, 01.12.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal Article

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effects of Plyometric Training on Physical Performance of Young Male Soccer Players: Potential Effects of Different Drop Jump Heights

AU - Ramírez-Campillo, Rodrigo

AU - Álvarez, Cristian

AU - García Pinillos, Felipe

AU - Gentil, Paulo

AU - Moran, Jason

AU - Pereira, Lucas A.

AU - Loturco, Irineu

PY - 2018/12/1

Y1 - 2018/12/1

N2 - Purpose: To compare the effects of plyometric drop jump training against those induced by regular soccer training, and to assess the transference effect coefficient (TEC) of drop-jumps (“trained exercises”) performed from 20- [DJ20] and 40-cm [DJ40] height boxes with respect to different physical qualities (jumping; linear and change of direction speed; kicking; endurance; maximal strength) in youth male soccer players. Methods: Participants were randomly divided into a control group (n=20; age: 13.5±1.9 years) and a drop jump (DJ) training group (n=19; age: 13.2±1.8 years); and trained for 7 weeks. To calculate the TEC between DJ20-DJ40 and the physical tests, the ratio between the “result gain” (effect-size [ES]) in the analyzed physical qualities and the result gain in the trained exercises were calculated. The TECs were only calculated for variables presenting an ES ≥0.2. Results: Significant improvements (ES=0.21-0.46; P < 0.05) were observed in the DJ training group, except in linear sprint performance. The control group improved only maximal strength (ES=0.28). Significant differences were observed in all variables (ES=0.20-0.55; P < 0.05) in favor of the DJ training group, except for maximal strength. Greater TECs were observed for DJ40 (0.58-1.28) than DJ20 (0.55-1.21). Conclusion: Our data suggest that youth players can improve their physical performance through the use of drop jumps. This is the first study that used the TEC to demonstrate the carry-over effect of plyometric training using drop jumps on physical performance of young soccer players.

AB - Purpose: To compare the effects of plyometric drop jump training against those induced by regular soccer training, and to assess the transference effect coefficient (TEC) of drop-jumps (“trained exercises”) performed from 20- [DJ20] and 40-cm [DJ40] height boxes with respect to different physical qualities (jumping; linear and change of direction speed; kicking; endurance; maximal strength) in youth male soccer players. Methods: Participants were randomly divided into a control group (n=20; age: 13.5±1.9 years) and a drop jump (DJ) training group (n=19; age: 13.2±1.8 years); and trained for 7 weeks. To calculate the TEC between DJ20-DJ40 and the physical tests, the ratio between the “result gain” (effect-size [ES]) in the analyzed physical qualities and the result gain in the trained exercises were calculated. The TECs were only calculated for variables presenting an ES ≥0.2. Results: Significant improvements (ES=0.21-0.46; P < 0.05) were observed in the DJ training group, except in linear sprint performance. The control group improved only maximal strength (ES=0.28). Significant differences were observed in all variables (ES=0.20-0.55; P < 0.05) in favor of the DJ training group, except for maximal strength. Greater TECs were observed for DJ40 (0.58-1.28) than DJ20 (0.55-1.21). Conclusion: Our data suggest that youth players can improve their physical performance through the use of drop jumps. This is the first study that used the TEC to demonstrate the carry-over effect of plyometric training using drop jumps on physical performance of young soccer players.

KW - plyometric

KW - explosive strength

KW - force-velocity

KW - maturity

KW - football

U2 - 10.1123/pes.2018-0207

DO - 10.1123/pes.2018-0207

M3 - Journal Article

JO - Pediatric Exercise Science

JF - Pediatric Exercise Science

SN - 0899-8493

ER -