Effects of progressed and non-progressed volume-based overload plyometric training on components of physical fitness and body composition variables in youth male basketball players

Ignacio Palma-Muñoz, Rodrigo Ramirez-Campillo, Jairo Azocar-Gallardo, Cristian Álvarez, Asadi Abbas, Jason Moran, Helmi Chaabene

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal Article

Abstract

This study examined the effect of six weeks of progressed and non-progressed volume-based overload plyometric training (PT) on components of physical fitness and body composition measures in young male basketball players, compared with an active control group. Participants were randomly assigned to a progressed PT (PPT, n=7; age=14.6±1.1 years), a non-progressed PT (NPPT, n=8, age=13.8±2.0 years), or a control group (CG, n=7, age=14.0±2.0 years). Before and after training, body composition measures (muscle-mass, fat-mass), countermovement-jump with (CMJA) and without arms (CMJ), horizontal bilateral (HCMJ) and unilateral jump with right (RJ) and left (LJ) legs, 20-cm drop-jump (DJ20), sprint speed (10 m sprint), and change-of-direction speed (CODS [i.e., T-test]) were tested. Results: Significant effects of time were observed for muscle- and fat-mass, all jump measures, and CODS (all p<0.01; d=0.37-0.83). Significant training-group×time interactions were observed for all jump measures (all p<0.05; d=0.24-0.41). Post-hoc analyses revealed significant pre-post performance improvements for the PPT (RJ and LJ: ∆18.6%, d=0.8 and ∆22.7%, d=0.9, respectively; HCMJ: ∆16.4%, d=0.8; CMJ: ∆22.4%, d=0.7; CMJA: ∆23.3%, d=0.7; DJ20: ∆39.7%, d=1.1) and for the NPPT group (LJ: ∆14.1%, d=0.4; DJ20: ∆32.9%, d=0.8) with greater changes after PPT compared to NPPT for all jump measures (all p<0.05; d=0.21-0.81). The training efficiency was greater (p<0.05; d=0.22) after PPT (0.015% per-jump) compared to NPPT (0.0053% per-jump). The PPT induced larger performance improvements on measures of physical fitness as compared to NPPT. Therefore, in-season progressive volume-based overload PT in young male basketball players is recommended.
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Strength and Conditioning Research
Early online date13 Nov 2018
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 13 Nov 2018

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Plyometric Exercise
Basketball
Physical Fitness
Body Composition
Body Weights and Measures
Fats
Muscles
Control Groups
Leg
Arm

Cite this

Palma-Muñoz, Ignacio ; Ramirez-Campillo, Rodrigo ; Azocar-Gallardo, Jairo ; Álvarez, Cristian ; Abbas, Asadi ; Moran, Jason ; Chaabene, Helmi. / Effects of progressed and non-progressed volume-based overload plyometric training on components of physical fitness and body composition variables in youth male basketball players. In: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research. 2018.
@article{0b42d3260e464c448562ea29a02a5aa5,
title = "Effects of progressed and non-progressed volume-based overload plyometric training on components of physical fitness and body composition variables in youth male basketball players",
abstract = "This study examined the effect of six weeks of progressed and non-progressed volume-based overload plyometric training (PT) on components of physical fitness and body composition measures in young male basketball players, compared with an active control group. Participants were randomly assigned to a progressed PT (PPT, n=7; age=14.6±1.1 years), a non-progressed PT (NPPT, n=8, age=13.8±2.0 years), or a control group (CG, n=7, age=14.0±2.0 years). Before and after training, body composition measures (muscle-mass, fat-mass), countermovement-jump with (CMJA) and without arms (CMJ), horizontal bilateral (HCMJ) and unilateral jump with right (RJ) and left (LJ) legs, 20-cm drop-jump (DJ20), sprint speed (10 m sprint), and change-of-direction speed (CODS [i.e., T-test]) were tested. Results: Significant effects of time were observed for muscle- and fat-mass, all jump measures, and CODS (all p<0.01; d=0.37-0.83). Significant training-group×time interactions were observed for all jump measures (all p<0.05; d=0.24-0.41). Post-hoc analyses revealed significant pre-post performance improvements for the PPT (RJ and LJ: ∆18.6{\%}, d=0.8 and ∆22.7{\%}, d=0.9, respectively; HCMJ: ∆16.4{\%}, d=0.8; CMJ: ∆22.4{\%}, d=0.7; CMJA: ∆23.3{\%}, d=0.7; DJ20: ∆39.7{\%}, d=1.1) and for the NPPT group (LJ: ∆14.1{\%}, d=0.4; DJ20: ∆32.9{\%}, d=0.8) with greater changes after PPT compared to NPPT for all jump measures (all p<0.05; d=0.21-0.81). The training efficiency was greater (p<0.05; d=0.22) after PPT (0.015{\%} per-jump) compared to NPPT (0.0053{\%} per-jump). The PPT induced larger performance improvements on measures of physical fitness as compared to NPPT. Therefore, in-season progressive volume-based overload PT in young male basketball players is recommended.",
author = "Ignacio Palma-Mu{\~n}oz and Rodrigo Ramirez-Campillo and Jairo Azocar-Gallardo and Cristian {\'A}lvarez and Asadi Abbas and Jason Moran and Helmi Chaabene",
year = "2018",
month = "11",
day = "13",
doi = "10.1519/JSC.0000000000002950",
language = "English",
journal = "Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research",
issn = "1064-8011",
publisher = "NSCA National Strength and Conditioning Association",

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Effects of progressed and non-progressed volume-based overload plyometric training on components of physical fitness and body composition variables in youth male basketball players. / Palma-Muñoz, Ignacio ; Ramirez-Campillo, Rodrigo; Azocar-Gallardo, Jairo; Álvarez, Cristian; Abbas, Asadi; Moran, Jason; Chaabene, Helmi.

In: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 13.11.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal Article

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effects of progressed and non-progressed volume-based overload plyometric training on components of physical fitness and body composition variables in youth male basketball players

AU - Palma-Muñoz, Ignacio

AU - Ramirez-Campillo, Rodrigo

AU - Azocar-Gallardo, Jairo

AU - Álvarez, Cristian

AU - Abbas, Asadi

AU - Moran, Jason

AU - Chaabene, Helmi

PY - 2018/11/13

Y1 - 2018/11/13

N2 - This study examined the effect of six weeks of progressed and non-progressed volume-based overload plyometric training (PT) on components of physical fitness and body composition measures in young male basketball players, compared with an active control group. Participants were randomly assigned to a progressed PT (PPT, n=7; age=14.6±1.1 years), a non-progressed PT (NPPT, n=8, age=13.8±2.0 years), or a control group (CG, n=7, age=14.0±2.0 years). Before and after training, body composition measures (muscle-mass, fat-mass), countermovement-jump with (CMJA) and without arms (CMJ), horizontal bilateral (HCMJ) and unilateral jump with right (RJ) and left (LJ) legs, 20-cm drop-jump (DJ20), sprint speed (10 m sprint), and change-of-direction speed (CODS [i.e., T-test]) were tested. Results: Significant effects of time were observed for muscle- and fat-mass, all jump measures, and CODS (all p<0.01; d=0.37-0.83). Significant training-group×time interactions were observed for all jump measures (all p<0.05; d=0.24-0.41). Post-hoc analyses revealed significant pre-post performance improvements for the PPT (RJ and LJ: ∆18.6%, d=0.8 and ∆22.7%, d=0.9, respectively; HCMJ: ∆16.4%, d=0.8; CMJ: ∆22.4%, d=0.7; CMJA: ∆23.3%, d=0.7; DJ20: ∆39.7%, d=1.1) and for the NPPT group (LJ: ∆14.1%, d=0.4; DJ20: ∆32.9%, d=0.8) with greater changes after PPT compared to NPPT for all jump measures (all p<0.05; d=0.21-0.81). The training efficiency was greater (p<0.05; d=0.22) after PPT (0.015% per-jump) compared to NPPT (0.0053% per-jump). The PPT induced larger performance improvements on measures of physical fitness as compared to NPPT. Therefore, in-season progressive volume-based overload PT in young male basketball players is recommended.

AB - This study examined the effect of six weeks of progressed and non-progressed volume-based overload plyometric training (PT) on components of physical fitness and body composition measures in young male basketball players, compared with an active control group. Participants were randomly assigned to a progressed PT (PPT, n=7; age=14.6±1.1 years), a non-progressed PT (NPPT, n=8, age=13.8±2.0 years), or a control group (CG, n=7, age=14.0±2.0 years). Before and after training, body composition measures (muscle-mass, fat-mass), countermovement-jump with (CMJA) and without arms (CMJ), horizontal bilateral (HCMJ) and unilateral jump with right (RJ) and left (LJ) legs, 20-cm drop-jump (DJ20), sprint speed (10 m sprint), and change-of-direction speed (CODS [i.e., T-test]) were tested. Results: Significant effects of time were observed for muscle- and fat-mass, all jump measures, and CODS (all p<0.01; d=0.37-0.83). Significant training-group×time interactions were observed for all jump measures (all p<0.05; d=0.24-0.41). Post-hoc analyses revealed significant pre-post performance improvements for the PPT (RJ and LJ: ∆18.6%, d=0.8 and ∆22.7%, d=0.9, respectively; HCMJ: ∆16.4%, d=0.8; CMJ: ∆22.4%, d=0.7; CMJA: ∆23.3%, d=0.7; DJ20: ∆39.7%, d=1.1) and for the NPPT group (LJ: ∆14.1%, d=0.4; DJ20: ∆32.9%, d=0.8) with greater changes after PPT compared to NPPT for all jump measures (all p<0.05; d=0.21-0.81). The training efficiency was greater (p<0.05; d=0.22) after PPT (0.015% per-jump) compared to NPPT (0.0053% per-jump). The PPT induced larger performance improvements on measures of physical fitness as compared to NPPT. Therefore, in-season progressive volume-based overload PT in young male basketball players is recommended.

U2 - 10.1519/JSC.0000000000002950

DO - 10.1519/JSC.0000000000002950

M3 - Journal Article

JO - Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research

JF - Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research

SN - 1064-8011

ER -