Effects of Variable Resistance Using Chains on Bench Throw Performance in Trained Rugby Players

Mark S Godwin, John F T Fernandes, Craig Twist

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal Article

Abstract

This study sought to determine the effects of variable resistance using chain resistance on bench throw performance. Eight male rugby union players (19.4 ± 2.3 y, 88.8 ± 6.0 kg, 1RM 105.6 ± 17.0 kg) were recruited from a national league team. In a randomised cross-over design participant's performed three bench throws at 45% one repetition maximum (1RM) at a constant load (No Chains) or a variable load (30% 1RM constant load, 15% 1RM variable load; Chains) with seven days between conditions. For each repetition the peak and mean velocity, peak power, peak acceleration and time to peak velocity were recorded. Differences in peak and mean power were very likely trivial and unclear between the Chains and No Chains conditions, respectively. Possibly greater peak and likely greater mean bar velocity were accompanied by likely to most likely greater bar velocity between 50-400 ms from initiation of bench press in the Chains compared to the No Chains condition. Accordingly, bar acceleration was very likely greater in the Chains compared to the No Chains condition. In conclusion, these results show that the inclusion of chain resistance can acutely enhance several variables in the bench press throw and gives support to this type of training.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)950-954
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Strength and Conditioning Research
Volume32
Issue number4
Early online date3 Jan 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2018
Externally publishedYes

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Football
Training Support
Cross-Over Studies

Keywords

  • Acceleration
  • Adolescent
  • Athletic Performance/physiology
  • Cross-Over Studies
  • Football/physiology
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Muscle Strength/physiology
  • Muscle, Skeletal/physiology
  • Resistance Training/methods
  • Young Adult

Cite this

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title = "Effects of Variable Resistance Using Chains on Bench Throw Performance in Trained Rugby Players",
abstract = "This study sought to determine the effects of variable resistance using chain resistance on bench throw performance. Eight male rugby union players (19.4 ± 2.3 y, 88.8 ± 6.0 kg, 1RM 105.6 ± 17.0 kg) were recruited from a national league team. In a randomised cross-over design participant's performed three bench throws at 45{\%} one repetition maximum (1RM) at a constant load (No Chains) or a variable load (30{\%} 1RM constant load, 15{\%} 1RM variable load; Chains) with seven days between conditions. For each repetition the peak and mean velocity, peak power, peak acceleration and time to peak velocity were recorded. Differences in peak and mean power were very likely trivial and unclear between the Chains and No Chains conditions, respectively. Possibly greater peak and likely greater mean bar velocity were accompanied by likely to most likely greater bar velocity between 50-400 ms from initiation of bench press in the Chains compared to the No Chains condition. Accordingly, bar acceleration was very likely greater in the Chains compared to the No Chains condition. In conclusion, these results show that the inclusion of chain resistance can acutely enhance several variables in the bench press throw and gives support to this type of training.",
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Effects of Variable Resistance Using Chains on Bench Throw Performance in Trained Rugby Players. / Godwin, Mark S; Fernandes, John F T; Twist, Craig.

In: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, Vol. 32, No. 4, 01.04.2018, p. 950-954.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal Article

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