International Survey of Equine Water Treadmills - Why, when and How?

Carolyne A. Tranquille, Jack B. Tacey, Vicki A. Walker, Kathryn Nankervis, Rachel C. Murray

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal Article

1 Citation (Scopus)
3 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Water treadmills (WTs) are becoming increasingly popular as rehabilitation and training tools. Concerns have been raised among equine professionals about injury development/exacerbation after WT use, and little knowledge of optimal WT use is available. The aim of this study was to determine how WTs are being used, using an international survey-based approach, with a view to informing future research. Venues were identified through internet searches and WT manufacturers. A questionnaire inquired about venue setup, caseload overview, and protocol overview. A case-specific questionnaire generated information about individual sessions. One hundred and twenty venue questionnaires were distributed and 41 responses (34%) were obtained; nine of these venues contributed 608 case-specific questionnaires. Water treadmills were found mostly at educational and rehabilitation centers, with four on private yards. Horse fitness, previous experience, age, weight and veterinary condition influenced individual protocols. All centers habituated their cases for 2–3 sessions, for an average of 16 minutes in hock or fetlock depth water. Significant differences between training and rehabilitation sessions were identified (deeper water, slower walk speed and longer duration for training compared to rehabilitation; P ≤ .023 for all three variables). Water treadmills were most frequently used for rehabilitation in horses with ligament and tendon injuries. Water treadmill habituation is important, and protocols were similar between venues. Water treadmills' usage was 60%:40% between training:rehabilitation with protocols varying significantly between venues.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)34-42
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Equine Veterinary Science
Volume69
Issue numberOctober
Early online date21 Jun 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2018

Fingerprint

exercise equipment
Horses
horses
rehabilitation (people)
Water
water
Rehabilitation
questionnaires
Surveys and Questionnaires
Animal Tarsus
Tendon Injuries
hock
Rehabilitation Centers
ligaments
tendons
Ligaments
Internet
Weights and Measures

Keywords

  • Equine
  • Protocols
  • Rehabilitation
  • Usage patterns
  • Water treadmill

Cite this

Tranquille, Carolyne A. ; Tacey, Jack B. ; Walker, Vicki A. ; Nankervis, Kathryn ; Murray, Rachel C. / International Survey of Equine Water Treadmills - Why, when and How?. In: Journal of Equine Veterinary Science. 2018 ; Vol. 69, No. October. pp. 34-42.
@article{82f3eeae0aeb453aa56aa1c9f648bd02,
title = "International Survey of Equine Water Treadmills - Why, when and How?",
abstract = "Water treadmills (WTs) are becoming increasingly popular as rehabilitation and training tools. Concerns have been raised among equine professionals about injury development/exacerbation after WT use, and little knowledge of optimal WT use is available. The aim of this study was to determine how WTs are being used, using an international survey-based approach, with a view to informing future research. Venues were identified through internet searches and WT manufacturers. A questionnaire inquired about venue setup, caseload overview, and protocol overview. A case-specific questionnaire generated information about individual sessions. One hundred and twenty venue questionnaires were distributed and 41 responses (34{\%}) were obtained; nine of these venues contributed 608 case-specific questionnaires. Water treadmills were found mostly at educational and rehabilitation centers, with four on private yards. Horse fitness, previous experience, age, weight and veterinary condition influenced individual protocols. All centers habituated their cases for 2–3 sessions, for an average of 16 minutes in hock or fetlock depth water. Significant differences between training and rehabilitation sessions were identified (deeper water, slower walk speed and longer duration for training compared to rehabilitation; P ≤ .023 for all three variables). Water treadmills were most frequently used for rehabilitation in horses with ligament and tendon injuries. Water treadmill habituation is important, and protocols were similar between venues. Water treadmills' usage was 60{\%}:40{\%} between training:rehabilitation with protocols varying significantly between venues.",
keywords = "Equine, Protocols, Rehabilitation, Usage patterns, Water treadmill",
author = "Tranquille, {Carolyne A.} and Tacey, {Jack B.} and Walker, {Vicki A.} and Kathryn Nankervis and Murray, {Rachel C.}",
year = "2018",
month = "10",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.jevs.2018.05.220",
language = "English",
volume = "69",
pages = "34--42",
journal = "Journal of Equine Veterinary Science",
issn = "0737-0806",
publisher = "W.B. Saunders Ltd",
number = "October",

}

International Survey of Equine Water Treadmills - Why, when and How? / Tranquille, Carolyne A.; Tacey, Jack B.; Walker, Vicki A.; Nankervis, Kathryn; Murray, Rachel C.

In: Journal of Equine Veterinary Science, Vol. 69, No. October, 01.10.2018, p. 34-42.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal Article

TY - JOUR

T1 - International Survey of Equine Water Treadmills - Why, when and How?

AU - Tranquille, Carolyne A.

AU - Tacey, Jack B.

AU - Walker, Vicki A.

AU - Nankervis, Kathryn

AU - Murray, Rachel C.

PY - 2018/10/1

Y1 - 2018/10/1

N2 - Water treadmills (WTs) are becoming increasingly popular as rehabilitation and training tools. Concerns have been raised among equine professionals about injury development/exacerbation after WT use, and little knowledge of optimal WT use is available. The aim of this study was to determine how WTs are being used, using an international survey-based approach, with a view to informing future research. Venues were identified through internet searches and WT manufacturers. A questionnaire inquired about venue setup, caseload overview, and protocol overview. A case-specific questionnaire generated information about individual sessions. One hundred and twenty venue questionnaires were distributed and 41 responses (34%) were obtained; nine of these venues contributed 608 case-specific questionnaires. Water treadmills were found mostly at educational and rehabilitation centers, with four on private yards. Horse fitness, previous experience, age, weight and veterinary condition influenced individual protocols. All centers habituated their cases for 2–3 sessions, for an average of 16 minutes in hock or fetlock depth water. Significant differences between training and rehabilitation sessions were identified (deeper water, slower walk speed and longer duration for training compared to rehabilitation; P ≤ .023 for all three variables). Water treadmills were most frequently used for rehabilitation in horses with ligament and tendon injuries. Water treadmill habituation is important, and protocols were similar between venues. Water treadmills' usage was 60%:40% between training:rehabilitation with protocols varying significantly between venues.

AB - Water treadmills (WTs) are becoming increasingly popular as rehabilitation and training tools. Concerns have been raised among equine professionals about injury development/exacerbation after WT use, and little knowledge of optimal WT use is available. The aim of this study was to determine how WTs are being used, using an international survey-based approach, with a view to informing future research. Venues were identified through internet searches and WT manufacturers. A questionnaire inquired about venue setup, caseload overview, and protocol overview. A case-specific questionnaire generated information about individual sessions. One hundred and twenty venue questionnaires were distributed and 41 responses (34%) were obtained; nine of these venues contributed 608 case-specific questionnaires. Water treadmills were found mostly at educational and rehabilitation centers, with four on private yards. Horse fitness, previous experience, age, weight and veterinary condition influenced individual protocols. All centers habituated their cases for 2–3 sessions, for an average of 16 minutes in hock or fetlock depth water. Significant differences between training and rehabilitation sessions were identified (deeper water, slower walk speed and longer duration for training compared to rehabilitation; P ≤ .023 for all three variables). Water treadmills were most frequently used for rehabilitation in horses with ligament and tendon injuries. Water treadmill habituation is important, and protocols were similar between venues. Water treadmills' usage was 60%:40% between training:rehabilitation with protocols varying significantly between venues.

KW - Equine

KW - Protocols

KW - Rehabilitation

KW - Usage patterns

KW - Water treadmill

U2 - 10.1016/j.jevs.2018.05.220

DO - 10.1016/j.jevs.2018.05.220

M3 - Journal Article

VL - 69

SP - 34

EP - 42

JO - Journal of Equine Veterinary Science

JF - Journal of Equine Veterinary Science

SN - 0737-0806

IS - October

ER -