Low Body Fat Does Not Influence Recovery after Muscle-Damaging Lower-Limb Plyometrics in Young Male Team Sport Athletes

John F. T. Fernandes, Kevin L. Lamb, Craig Twist

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal Articlepeer-review

Abstract

Aim: This study assessed the influence of fat mass to fat-free mass ratio (FM:FFM) on recovery from plyometric exercise. Method: After assessment of body composition, 20 male team sport players (age 20.7 ± 1.1 years; body mass 77.1 ± 11.5 kg) were divided into low- (n = 10; 0.11 ± 0.03) and normal- (n = 10; 0.27 ± 0.09) fat groups based on FM:FFM ratio. Thereafter, participants completed measurements of knee extensor torque at 60 and 240°∙s−1, countermovement jump flight time, plasma creatine kinase (CK) activity and perceived muscle soreness (VAS) before and at 0, 24 and 48 h after 10 × 10 maximal plyometric vertical jumps. Results: Evidence of muscle damage was confirmed by alterations in VAS, peak torque at 60 and 240°∙s−1 and flight time at 0, 24 and 48 h after plyometric exercise (P 0.05). CK was increased at 0 and 24 h (P 0.05) but returned to baseline values by 48 h. No time by group effects were observed for any of the dependent variables (P > 0.05). Conclusion: The current findings indicate that while muscle damage was present after plyometric exercise, the magnitude was similar across the two body composition groups. Applied practitioners can allow for a similar recovery time after plyometric exercise in those with low and normal body fat.
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Functional Morphology and Kinesiology
Volume5
Issue number4
Early online date5 Nov 2020
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 5 Nov 2020

Keywords

  • exercise-induced muscle damage
  • stretch-shortening cycle
  • fat mass
  • muscle function

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