Low-stress handling for long-term wound care

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal Article

Abstract

Many canine patients have a requirement to return to the veterinary practice on a regular basis for treatment. Those that have associations of fear or anxiety with a practice, can find themselves in extremely stressful situations, effecting not only the animal but also the owner. Therefore it is important to take into consideration the welfare of the animals that are returning for further consultations, such as wound care. Consideration of what can be done to try and make these visits as stress-free as possible is essential. The veterinary nurse should be aware of methods that can be utilised to distract patients when undergoing potentially uncomfortable and stressful treatments.
Original languageEnglish
JournalThe Veterinary Nurse
Volume10
Issue number10
Early online date24 Dec 2019
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 24 Dec 2019

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Long-Term Care
Animal Technicians
Animal Welfare
Wounds and Injuries
Fear
Canidae
Referral and Consultation
Anxiety
Therapeutics
Handling (Psychology)

Cite this

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abstract = "Many canine patients have a requirement to return to the veterinary practice on a regular basis for treatment. Those that have associations of fear or anxiety with a practice, can find themselves in extremely stressful situations, effecting not only the animal but also the owner. Therefore it is important to take into consideration the welfare of the animals that are returning for further consultations, such as wound care. Consideration of what can be done to try and make these visits as stress-free as possible is essential. The veterinary nurse should be aware of methods that can be utilised to distract patients when undergoing potentially uncomfortable and stressful treatments.",
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Low-stress handling for long-term wound care. / Vivian, Sarah.

In: The Veterinary Nurse, Vol. 10, No. 10, 24.12.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal Article

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