Maximal Oxygen Uptake Is Achievedin Hypoxia but Not Normoxia during an Exhaustive Severe Intensity Run

Matthew I. Black, Christopher Potter, Jo Corbett, C. C. T. Clark, Stephen Draper

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (peer-reviewed)

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Abstract

Highly aerobically trained individuals are unable to achieve maximal oxygen uptake (V˙ O2max) during exhaustive running lasting ∼2 min, instead V˙ O2 plateaus below V˙ O2max after ∼1 min. Hypoxia offers the opportunity to study the (V˙ O2) response to an exhaustive run relative to a hypoxia induced reduction in V˙ O2max. The aim of this study was to explore whether there is a difference in the percentage of V˙ O2max achieved (during a 2min exhaustive run) in normoxia and hypoxia. Fourteen competitive middle distance runners (normoxic V˙ O2max 67.0 ± 5.2 ml.kg−1.min−1) completed exhaustive treadmill ramp tests and constant work rate (CWR) tests in normoxia and hypoxia (FiO2 0.13). The V˙ O2 data from the CWR tests were modeled using a single exponential function. End exercise normoxic CWR V˙ O2 was less than normoxic V˙ O2max (86 ± 6% ramp, P < 0.001). During the hypoxic CWR test, hypoxic V˙ O2max was achieved (102 ± 8% ramp, P = 0.490). The phase II time constant was greater in hypoxia (12.7 ± 2.8 s) relative to normoxia (10.4 ± 2.6 s) (P = 0.029). The results demonstrate that highly aerobically trained individuals cannot achieve V˙ O2max during exhaustive severe intensity treadmill running in normoxia, but can achieve the lower V˙ O2max in hypoxia despite a slightly slower V˙ O2 response.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationHigh-Intensity Exercise in Hypoxia- Beneficial Aspects and Potential Drawbacks
EditorsOliver Girard, Donald R. McCrimmon, Gregoire P. Millet
Place of PublicationLaussanne
PublisherFrontiers Research Topics
Chapter3
Pages30-36
Number of pages7
ISBN (Electronic)978-2-88945-406-8
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2018

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Black, M. I., Potter, C., Corbett, J., Clark, C. C. T., & Draper, S. (2018). Maximal Oxygen Uptake Is Achievedin Hypoxia but Not Normoxia during an Exhaustive Severe Intensity Run. In O. Girard, D. R. McCrimmon, & G. P. Millet (Eds.), High-Intensity Exercise in Hypoxia- Beneficial Aspects and Potential Drawbacks (pp. 30-36). Laussanne: Frontiers Research Topics.
Black, Matthew I. ; Potter, Christopher ; Corbett, Jo ; Clark, C. C. T. ; Draper, Stephen. / Maximal Oxygen Uptake Is Achievedin Hypoxia but Not Normoxia during an Exhaustive Severe Intensity Run. High-Intensity Exercise in Hypoxia- Beneficial Aspects and Potential Drawbacks. editor / Oliver Girard ; Donald R. McCrimmon ; Gregoire P. Millet. Laussanne : Frontiers Research Topics, 2018. pp. 30-36
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Black, MI, Potter, C, Corbett, J, Clark, CCT & Draper, S 2018, Maximal Oxygen Uptake Is Achievedin Hypoxia but Not Normoxia during an Exhaustive Severe Intensity Run. in O Girard, DR McCrimmon & GP Millet (eds), High-Intensity Exercise in Hypoxia- Beneficial Aspects and Potential Drawbacks. Frontiers Research Topics, Laussanne, pp. 30-36.

Maximal Oxygen Uptake Is Achievedin Hypoxia but Not Normoxia during an Exhaustive Severe Intensity Run. / Black, Matthew I.; Potter, Christopher; Corbett, Jo; Clark, C. C. T.; Draper, Stephen.

High-Intensity Exercise in Hypoxia- Beneficial Aspects and Potential Drawbacks. ed. / Oliver Girard; Donald R. McCrimmon; Gregoire P. Millet. Laussanne : Frontiers Research Topics, 2018. p. 30-36.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (peer-reviewed)

TY - CHAP

T1 - Maximal Oxygen Uptake Is Achievedin Hypoxia but Not Normoxia during an Exhaustive Severe Intensity Run

AU - Black, Matthew I.

AU - Potter, Christopher

AU - Corbett, Jo

AU - Clark, C. C. T.

AU - Draper, Stephen

PY - 2018/1

Y1 - 2018/1

N2 - Highly aerobically trained individuals are unable to achieve maximal oxygen uptake (V˙ O2max) during exhaustive running lasting ∼2 min, instead V˙ O2 plateaus below V˙ O2max after ∼1 min. Hypoxia offers the opportunity to study the (V˙ O2) response to an exhaustive run relative to a hypoxia induced reduction in V˙ O2max. The aim of this study was to explore whether there is a difference in the percentage of V˙ O2max achieved (during a 2min exhaustive run) in normoxia and hypoxia. Fourteen competitive middle distance runners (normoxic V˙ O2max 67.0 ± 5.2 ml.kg−1.min−1) completed exhaustive treadmill ramp tests and constant work rate (CWR) tests in normoxia and hypoxia (FiO2 0.13). The V˙ O2 data from the CWR tests were modeled using a single exponential function. End exercise normoxic CWR V˙ O2 was less than normoxic V˙ O2max (86 ± 6% ramp, P < 0.001). During the hypoxic CWR test, hypoxic V˙ O2max was achieved (102 ± 8% ramp, P = 0.490). The phase II time constant was greater in hypoxia (12.7 ± 2.8 s) relative to normoxia (10.4 ± 2.6 s) (P = 0.029). The results demonstrate that highly aerobically trained individuals cannot achieve V˙ O2max during exhaustive severe intensity treadmill running in normoxia, but can achieve the lower V˙ O2max in hypoxia despite a slightly slower V˙ O2 response.

AB - Highly aerobically trained individuals are unable to achieve maximal oxygen uptake (V˙ O2max) during exhaustive running lasting ∼2 min, instead V˙ O2 plateaus below V˙ O2max after ∼1 min. Hypoxia offers the opportunity to study the (V˙ O2) response to an exhaustive run relative to a hypoxia induced reduction in V˙ O2max. The aim of this study was to explore whether there is a difference in the percentage of V˙ O2max achieved (during a 2min exhaustive run) in normoxia and hypoxia. Fourteen competitive middle distance runners (normoxic V˙ O2max 67.0 ± 5.2 ml.kg−1.min−1) completed exhaustive treadmill ramp tests and constant work rate (CWR) tests in normoxia and hypoxia (FiO2 0.13). The V˙ O2 data from the CWR tests were modeled using a single exponential function. End exercise normoxic CWR V˙ O2 was less than normoxic V˙ O2max (86 ± 6% ramp, P < 0.001). During the hypoxic CWR test, hypoxic V˙ O2max was achieved (102 ± 8% ramp, P = 0.490). The phase II time constant was greater in hypoxia (12.7 ± 2.8 s) relative to normoxia (10.4 ± 2.6 s) (P = 0.029). The results demonstrate that highly aerobically trained individuals cannot achieve V˙ O2max during exhaustive severe intensity treadmill running in normoxia, but can achieve the lower V˙ O2max in hypoxia despite a slightly slower V˙ O2 response.

M3 - Chapter (peer-reviewed)

SP - 30

EP - 36

BT - High-Intensity Exercise in Hypoxia- Beneficial Aspects and Potential Drawbacks

A2 - Girard, Oliver

A2 - McCrimmon, Donald R.

A2 - Millet, Gregoire P.

PB - Frontiers Research Topics

CY - Laussanne

ER -

Black MI, Potter C, Corbett J, Clark CCT, Draper S. Maximal Oxygen Uptake Is Achievedin Hypoxia but Not Normoxia during an Exhaustive Severe Intensity Run. In Girard O, McCrimmon DR, Millet GP, editors, High-Intensity Exercise in Hypoxia- Beneficial Aspects and Potential Drawbacks. Laussanne: Frontiers Research Topics. 2018. p. 30-36