Physical Activity Behavior and Role Overload in Mothers

Geoff P. Lovell, Frances R. Butler

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal Article

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We examined physical activity stages of change, physical activity behavior, and role overload in different stages of motherhood in a predominantly Australian sample. Neither physical activity behavior, stages of physical activity change, nor role overload significantly differed across motherhood groups. Role overload was significantly higher for mothers in the contemplation, planning, and action stages of physical activity than in the maintenance stage of change. Role overload had a weak, although significant, negative correlation with leisure-time physical activity. We conclude that strategies focused upon reducing role overload or perceived role overload have only limited potential to meaningfully increase leisure-time physical activity in mothers.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)342-355
Number of pages14
JournalHealth Care for Women International
Volume36
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 4 Mar 2015
Externally publishedYes

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Physical Activity Behavior and Role Overload in Mothers. / Lovell, Geoff P.; Butler, Frances R.

In: Health Care for Women International, Vol. 36, No. 3, 04.03.2015, p. 342-355.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal Article

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