Riders' perception of symmetrical pressure on their ischial tuberosities and rein contact tension whilst sitting on a static object

R. Guire, H. Mathie, Mark Fisher, D. Fisher

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal Articlepeer-review

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The horse-rider system is of great interest in understanding the mechanics involved in optimising locomotor function and performance in the ridden horse. Adult riders (n=30) attending a rider conference volunteered to take part in the study. Riders were asked to mimic riding position by positioning themselves symmetrically on their seat bones (ischial tuberosities) sitting on a (Pliance) pressure mat which was placed on a static platform. Riders were also asked to mimic even rein contact using reins with gauges which were attached to a solid wall. When satisfied that they were sitting symmetrically and had an even rein contact, pressure and rein measurements were captured for 5 s and repeated three times. A paired T Test was carried out to determine differences between left and right ischial tuberosities and rein pressures. Using a static model, this study found that the riders had significantly more pressure beneath the left ischial tuberosity (mean ± standard deviation, 3.22±1.43 N/cm2) compared to the right (2.65±1.49 N/cm2) (P=0.04) and no significant differences were observed between left (6.37±2.42 N) and right rein pressure (6.38±2.66 N) (P=0.95). Whilst sitting on a static platform, differences in ischial tuberosity pressure in adult riders were observed despite these riders' perception that their seat was symmetrically weighted. These differences observed need to be investigated further, dynamically, to determine if there is a similar trend in the ridden situation.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)7-12
Number of pages6
JournalComparative Exercise Physiology
Volume13
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Asymmetry
  • Locomotion
  • Rein tension
  • Seat bones

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