Sequencing effects of plyometric training applied before or after regular soccer training on measures of physical fitness in young players

Rodrigo Ramírez-Campillo, Cristian Álvarez, Paulo Gentil, Irineu Loturco, Javier Sánchez, Mikel Izquierdo, Jason Moran, Fábio Yuzo Nakamura, Helmi Chaabene, Urs Granacher

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal Article

Abstract

To compare the effects of short-term (i.e., 7 week) plyometric training applied before (PJT-B) or after (PJT-A) soccer practice on components of physical fitness in young soccer players, a single-blind randomized controlled trial was conducted. Post-pubertal boys aged 17.0±0.5 years were allocated to three groups: PJT-B (n=12), PJT-A (n=14), and control (CON; n=12). The outcome measures included tests to evaluate 20-m speed, standing long jump [SLJ], squat jump [SJ], countermovement jump [CMJ], and drop jump [DJ], 20-m multistage shuttle running speed [MSSRT], and Illinois change of direction speed [ICODT]. While the CON performed soccer-specific training, the PJT-A and PJT-B groups conducted the same soccer-specific sessions but replaced ~11% of their time with plyometric training. The PJT-B group performed plyometric exercises after a warm-up program, and the PJT-A group conducted plyometric exercises ~10 minutes after the completion of soccer training. Analyses of variance (ANOVAs) were used to detect differences between groups in all variables for pre- and post-training tests. Main effects of time (all p<.01; d=0.19-0.79) and group x time interactions (all p<.05; d=0.17-0.76) were observed for all examined variables. Post hoc analyses revealed significant increases in the PJT-B group (SLJ: 9.4%, d=1.7; CMJ: 11.2%, d=0.75; 20-m MSSRT: 9.0%, d=0.77) and the PJT-A group (SLJ: 3.1%, d=0.7; CMJ: 4.9%, d=0.27; 20-m MSSRT: 9.0%, d=0.76). Post hoc analyses also revealed significant increases in the PJT-B group (20-m speed: -7.4%, d=0.75; 20-cm DJ reactive strength index: 19.1%, d=1.4; SJ: 6.3%, d=0.44; ICODT results: -4.2%, d=1.1). In general, our study revealed that plyometric training is effective in improving measures of physical fitness in young male soccer players when combined with regular soccer training. More specifically, larger training induced effects on physical fitness were registered if plyometric training was conducted prior to soccer specific training.
LanguageEnglish
JournalJournal of Strength and Conditioning Research
Early online date22 Mar 2018
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 22 Mar 2018

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Plyometric Exercise
Soccer
Physical Fitness
Running
Analysis of Variance
Randomized Controlled Trials
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

Publication statement

This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research and can be accessed at http://dx.doi.org/ 10.1519/JSC.0000000000002525

Cite this

Ramírez-Campillo, Rodrigo ; Álvarez, Cristian ; Gentil, Paulo ; Loturco, Irineu ; Sánchez, Javier ; Izquierdo, Mikel ; Moran, Jason ; Nakamura, Fábio Yuzo ; Chaabene, Helmi ; Granacher, Urs. / Sequencing effects of plyometric training applied before or after regular soccer training on measures of physical fitness in young players. In: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research. 2018.
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title = "Sequencing effects of plyometric training applied before or after regular soccer training on measures of physical fitness in young players",
abstract = "To compare the effects of short-term (i.e., 7 week) plyometric training applied before (PJT-B) or after (PJT-A) soccer practice on components of physical fitness in young soccer players, a single-blind randomized controlled trial was conducted. Post-pubertal boys aged 17.0±0.5 years were allocated to three groups: PJT-B (n=12), PJT-A (n=14), and control (CON; n=12). The outcome measures included tests to evaluate 20-m speed, standing long jump [SLJ], squat jump [SJ], countermovement jump [CMJ], and drop jump [DJ], 20-m multistage shuttle running speed [MSSRT], and Illinois change of direction speed [ICODT]. While the CON performed soccer-specific training, the PJT-A and PJT-B groups conducted the same soccer-specific sessions but replaced ~11{\%} of their time with plyometric training. The PJT-B group performed plyometric exercises after a warm-up program, and the PJT-A group conducted plyometric exercises ~10 minutes after the completion of soccer training. Analyses of variance (ANOVAs) were used to detect differences between groups in all variables for pre- and post-training tests. Main effects of time (all p<.01; d=0.19-0.79) and group x time interactions (all p<.05; d=0.17-0.76) were observed for all examined variables. Post hoc analyses revealed significant increases in the PJT-B group (SLJ: 9.4{\%}, d=1.7; CMJ: 11.2{\%}, d=0.75; 20-m MSSRT: 9.0{\%}, d=0.77) and the PJT-A group (SLJ: 3.1{\%}, d=0.7; CMJ: 4.9{\%}, d=0.27; 20-m MSSRT: 9.0{\%}, d=0.76). Post hoc analyses also revealed significant increases in the PJT-B group (20-m speed: -7.4{\%}, d=0.75; 20-cm DJ reactive strength index: 19.1{\%}, d=1.4; SJ: 6.3{\%}, d=0.44; ICODT results: -4.2{\%}, d=1.1). In general, our study revealed that plyometric training is effective in improving measures of physical fitness in young male soccer players when combined with regular soccer training. More specifically, larger training induced effects on physical fitness were registered if plyometric training was conducted prior to soccer specific training.",
author = "Rodrigo Ram{\'i}rez-Campillo and Cristian {\'A}lvarez and Paulo Gentil and Irineu Loturco and Javier S{\'a}nchez and Mikel Izquierdo and Jason Moran and Nakamura, {F{\'a}bio Yuzo} and Helmi Chaabene and Urs Granacher",
year = "2018",
month = "3",
day = "22",
doi = "10.1519/JSC.0000000000002525",
language = "English",
journal = "Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research",
issn = "1064-8011",
publisher = "NSCA National Strength and Conditioning Association",

}

Sequencing effects of plyometric training applied before or after regular soccer training on measures of physical fitness in young players. / Ramírez-Campillo, Rodrigo; Álvarez, Cristian; Gentil, Paulo; Loturco, Irineu; Sánchez, Javier; Izquierdo, Mikel; Moran, Jason; Nakamura, Fábio Yuzo; Chaabene, Helmi; Granacher, Urs.

In: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 22.03.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal Article

TY - JOUR

T1 - Sequencing effects of plyometric training applied before or after regular soccer training on measures of physical fitness in young players

AU - Ramírez-Campillo, Rodrigo

AU - Álvarez, Cristian

AU - Gentil, Paulo

AU - Loturco, Irineu

AU - Sánchez, Javier

AU - Izquierdo, Mikel

AU - Moran, Jason

AU - Nakamura, Fábio Yuzo

AU - Chaabene, Helmi

AU - Granacher, Urs

PY - 2018/3/22

Y1 - 2018/3/22

N2 - To compare the effects of short-term (i.e., 7 week) plyometric training applied before (PJT-B) or after (PJT-A) soccer practice on components of physical fitness in young soccer players, a single-blind randomized controlled trial was conducted. Post-pubertal boys aged 17.0±0.5 years were allocated to three groups: PJT-B (n=12), PJT-A (n=14), and control (CON; n=12). The outcome measures included tests to evaluate 20-m speed, standing long jump [SLJ], squat jump [SJ], countermovement jump [CMJ], and drop jump [DJ], 20-m multistage shuttle running speed [MSSRT], and Illinois change of direction speed [ICODT]. While the CON performed soccer-specific training, the PJT-A and PJT-B groups conducted the same soccer-specific sessions but replaced ~11% of their time with plyometric training. The PJT-B group performed plyometric exercises after a warm-up program, and the PJT-A group conducted plyometric exercises ~10 minutes after the completion of soccer training. Analyses of variance (ANOVAs) were used to detect differences between groups in all variables for pre- and post-training tests. Main effects of time (all p<.01; d=0.19-0.79) and group x time interactions (all p<.05; d=0.17-0.76) were observed for all examined variables. Post hoc analyses revealed significant increases in the PJT-B group (SLJ: 9.4%, d=1.7; CMJ: 11.2%, d=0.75; 20-m MSSRT: 9.0%, d=0.77) and the PJT-A group (SLJ: 3.1%, d=0.7; CMJ: 4.9%, d=0.27; 20-m MSSRT: 9.0%, d=0.76). Post hoc analyses also revealed significant increases in the PJT-B group (20-m speed: -7.4%, d=0.75; 20-cm DJ reactive strength index: 19.1%, d=1.4; SJ: 6.3%, d=0.44; ICODT results: -4.2%, d=1.1). In general, our study revealed that plyometric training is effective in improving measures of physical fitness in young male soccer players when combined with regular soccer training. More specifically, larger training induced effects on physical fitness were registered if plyometric training was conducted prior to soccer specific training.

AB - To compare the effects of short-term (i.e., 7 week) plyometric training applied before (PJT-B) or after (PJT-A) soccer practice on components of physical fitness in young soccer players, a single-blind randomized controlled trial was conducted. Post-pubertal boys aged 17.0±0.5 years were allocated to three groups: PJT-B (n=12), PJT-A (n=14), and control (CON; n=12). The outcome measures included tests to evaluate 20-m speed, standing long jump [SLJ], squat jump [SJ], countermovement jump [CMJ], and drop jump [DJ], 20-m multistage shuttle running speed [MSSRT], and Illinois change of direction speed [ICODT]. While the CON performed soccer-specific training, the PJT-A and PJT-B groups conducted the same soccer-specific sessions but replaced ~11% of their time with plyometric training. The PJT-B group performed plyometric exercises after a warm-up program, and the PJT-A group conducted plyometric exercises ~10 minutes after the completion of soccer training. Analyses of variance (ANOVAs) were used to detect differences between groups in all variables for pre- and post-training tests. Main effects of time (all p<.01; d=0.19-0.79) and group x time interactions (all p<.05; d=0.17-0.76) were observed for all examined variables. Post hoc analyses revealed significant increases in the PJT-B group (SLJ: 9.4%, d=1.7; CMJ: 11.2%, d=0.75; 20-m MSSRT: 9.0%, d=0.77) and the PJT-A group (SLJ: 3.1%, d=0.7; CMJ: 4.9%, d=0.27; 20-m MSSRT: 9.0%, d=0.76). Post hoc analyses also revealed significant increases in the PJT-B group (20-m speed: -7.4%, d=0.75; 20-cm DJ reactive strength index: 19.1%, d=1.4; SJ: 6.3%, d=0.44; ICODT results: -4.2%, d=1.1). In general, our study revealed that plyometric training is effective in improving measures of physical fitness in young male soccer players when combined with regular soccer training. More specifically, larger training induced effects on physical fitness were registered if plyometric training was conducted prior to soccer specific training.

U2 - 10.1519/JSC.0000000000002525

DO - 10.1519/JSC.0000000000002525

M3 - Journal Article

JO - Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research

T2 - Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research

JF - Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research

SN - 1064-8011

ER -