Somatic anxiety and physiological arousal: Their effects upon a high anaerobic, low memory demand task

G Parfitt, L Hardy, J Pates

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal Article

Abstract

Explored the relationship between cognitive anxiety, somatic anxiety, physiological arousal, and Sargent jump performance. Data were collected in 2 experiments from a total of 32 basketball and volleyball players (mean age 21 yrs) to test 3 hypotheses: (1) somatic anxiety is positively related to Sargent jump performance while cognitive anxiety is not related to Sargent jump performance; (2) physiological arousal is also positively related to Sargent jump performance; and (3) physiological arousal is more strongly related to Sargent jump performance than somatic anxiety. Results support the 3 hypotheses, and indicate that for this task increased somatic anxiety positively affects height jumped, cognitive anxiety does not affect performance, increased physiological arousal positively affects height jumped, and physiological arousal is more strongly related to performance than somatic anxiety.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)196-213
Number of pages18
JournalInternational Journal of Sport Psychology
Volume26
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 1995
Externally publishedYes

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