Stereotyping starlings are more 'pessimistic'

Ben O. Brilot, Lucy Asher, Melissa Bateson

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal Article

70 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Negative affect in humans and animals is known to cause individuals to interpret ambiguous stimuli pessimistically, a phenomenon termed 'cognitive bias'. Here, we used captive European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) to test the hypothesis that a reduction in environmental conditions, from enriched to non-enriched cages, would engender negative affect, and hence 'pessimistic' biases. We also explored whether individual differences in stereotypic behaviour (repetitive somersaulting) predicted 'pessimism'. Eight birds were trained on a novel conditional discrimination task with differential rewards, in which background shade (light or dark) determined which of two covered dishes contained a food reward. The reward was small when the background was light, but large when the background was dark. We then presented background shades intermediate between those trained to assess the birds' bias to choose the dish associated with the smaller food reward (a 'pessimistic' judgement) when the discriminative stimulus was ambiguous. Contrary to predictions, changes in the level of cage enrichment had no effect on 'pessimism'. However, changes in the latency to choose and probability of expressing a choice suggested that birds learnt rapidly that trials with ambiguous stimuli were unreinforced. Individual differences in performance of stereotypies did predict 'pessimism'. Specifically, birds that somersaulted were more likely to choose the dish associated with the smaller food reward in the presence of the most ambiguous discriminative stimulus. We propose that somersaulting is part of a wider suite of behavioural traits indicative of a stress response to captive conditions that is symptomatic of a negative affective state.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)721-731
Number of pages11
JournalAnimal Cognition
Volume13
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Starlings
Stereotyping
Sturnidae
Reward
Birds
bird
Sturnus vulgaris
birds
food
stereotypic behavior
shade
cages
Individuality
Food
stereotyped behavior
Light
stress response
environmental conditions
environmental factors
prediction

Keywords

  • Anxiety
  • Cognitive bias
  • Environmental enrichment
  • European starling
  • Stereotypic behaviour
  • Sturnus vulgaris

Cite this

Brilot, Ben O. ; Asher, Lucy ; Bateson, Melissa. / Stereotyping starlings are more 'pessimistic'. In: Animal Cognition. 2010 ; Vol. 13, No. 5. pp. 721-731.
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Stereotyping starlings are more 'pessimistic'. / Brilot, Ben O.; Asher, Lucy; Bateson, Melissa.

In: Animal Cognition, Vol. 13, No. 5, 09.2010, p. 721-731.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal Article

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