The effect of water height on stride frequency, stride length and heart rate during water treadmill exercise

Rosie Scott, Kathryn Nankervis, C Stringer, K Westcott, David Marlin

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    20 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Reasons for performing study: Water treadmill exercise is often incorporated into rehabilitation programmes for horses yet little is known about the biomechanical and physiological responses to water walking. Objectives: To establish whether stride frequency (SF) reached steady state as a result of 6 introductory water treadmill sessions and then to investigate the effect of increasing water height on SF, stride length (SL) and heart rate (HR). Methods: Nine horses with no previous experience of water treadmills completed 6 sessions of walking for between 15 and 30 min. Each horse was fitted with a leg mounted accelerometer to measure SF. The effect of session on SF was tested using univariate ANOVA. Eight horses completed 3 further sessions at each of the following water heights; proximal interphalangeal joint (PIP), carpus and ulna. SF, SL and HR at each water height were compared to a control (hoof height) using univariate ANOVA. Results: When SF during introductory sessions 4–6 were compared, there was no significant effect of session on SF (P>0.05). In the second part of the experiment, SF was 0.57 ± 0.03 strides/s at control, 0.54 ± 0.03 strides/s at the PIP joint, 0.51 ± 0.02 strides/s at the carpus and 0.52 ± 0.03 strides/s at the ulna. Stride frequency at carpal and ulna height was significantly lower than at control (P<0.05). Stride length was 1.53 ± 0.09 m for control, 1.63 ± 0.10 m at the PIP joint, 1.71 ± 0.08 m at the carpus and 1.68 ± 0.10 m at the ulna. Stride length at carpal and ulna height was significantly greater than control (P<0.05). There was no significant difference between HR during control and any other water height (P>0.05). Conclusion: Horses reached steady state gait within the first 6 sessions of water treadmill exercise. Walking in water at the level of the carpus or ulna resulted in a lower SF compared to walking in water at hoof height.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationEquine Veterinary Journal
    PublisherWiley-Blackwell
    Pages662-664
    Number of pages2
    Volume42
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 8 Nov 2010
    Event 8th International Conference on Equine Exercise Physiology - Cape Town, South Africa
    Duration: 7 Nov 201012 Nov 2010

    Conference

    Conference 8th International Conference on Equine Exercise Physiology
    Abbreviated titleICEEP 2010
    CountrySouth Africa
    CityCape Town
    Period7/11/1012/11/10

    Fingerprint

    exercise equipment
    heart rate
    exercise
    Heart Rate
    Water
    Ulna
    ulna
    Horses
    water
    walking
    carpus
    Walking
    horses
    joints (animal)
    Hoof and Claw
    Joints
    hooves
    Analysis of Variance
    analysis of variance
    gait

    All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

    • Equine

    Cite this

    Scott, R., Nankervis, K., Stringer, C., Westcott, K., & Marlin, D. (2010). The effect of water height on stride frequency, stride length and heart rate during water treadmill exercise. In Equine Veterinary Journal (Vol. 42, pp. 662-664). Wiley-Blackwell. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.2042-3306.2010.00194.x
    Scott, Rosie ; Nankervis, Kathryn ; Stringer, C ; Westcott, K ; Marlin, David. / The effect of water height on stride frequency, stride length and heart rate during water treadmill exercise. Equine Veterinary Journal. Vol. 42 Wiley-Blackwell, 2010. pp. 662-664
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    title = "The effect of water height on stride frequency, stride length and heart rate during water treadmill exercise",
    abstract = "Reasons for performing study: Water treadmill exercise is often incorporated into rehabilitation programmes for horses yet little is known about the biomechanical and physiological responses to water walking. Objectives: To establish whether stride frequency (SF) reached steady state as a result of 6 introductory water treadmill sessions and then to investigate the effect of increasing water height on SF, stride length (SL) and heart rate (HR). Methods: Nine horses with no previous experience of water treadmills completed 6 sessions of walking for between 15 and 30 min. Each horse was fitted with a leg mounted accelerometer to measure SF. The effect of session on SF was tested using univariate ANOVA. Eight horses completed 3 further sessions at each of the following water heights; proximal interphalangeal joint (PIP), carpus and ulna. SF, SL and HR at each water height were compared to a control (hoof height) using univariate ANOVA. Results: When SF during introductory sessions 4–6 were compared, there was no significant effect of session on SF (P>0.05). In the second part of the experiment, SF was 0.57 ± 0.03 strides/s at control, 0.54 ± 0.03 strides/s at the PIP joint, 0.51 ± 0.02 strides/s at the carpus and 0.52 ± 0.03 strides/s at the ulna. Stride frequency at carpal and ulna height was significantly lower than at control (P<0.05). Stride length was 1.53 ± 0.09 m for control, 1.63 ± 0.10 m at the PIP joint, 1.71 ± 0.08 m at the carpus and 1.68 ± 0.10 m at the ulna. Stride length at carpal and ulna height was significantly greater than control (P<0.05). There was no significant difference between HR during control and any other water height (P>0.05). Conclusion: Horses reached steady state gait within the first 6 sessions of water treadmill exercise. Walking in water at the level of the carpus or ulna resulted in a lower SF compared to walking in water at hoof height.",
    author = "Rosie Scott and Kathryn Nankervis and C Stringer and K Westcott and David Marlin",
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    Scott, R, Nankervis, K, Stringer, C, Westcott, K & Marlin, D 2010, The effect of water height on stride frequency, stride length and heart rate during water treadmill exercise. in Equine Veterinary Journal. vol. 42, Wiley-Blackwell, pp. 662-664, 8th International Conference on Equine Exercise Physiology , Cape Town, South Africa, 7/11/10. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.2042-3306.2010.00194.x

    The effect of water height on stride frequency, stride length and heart rate during water treadmill exercise. / Scott, Rosie; Nankervis, Kathryn; Stringer, C; Westcott, K; Marlin, David.

    Equine Veterinary Journal. Vol. 42 Wiley-Blackwell, 2010. p. 662-664.

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    TY - GEN

    T1 - The effect of water height on stride frequency, stride length and heart rate during water treadmill exercise

    AU - Scott, Rosie

    AU - Nankervis, Kathryn

    AU - Stringer, C

    AU - Westcott, K

    AU - Marlin, David

    PY - 2010/11/8

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    N2 - Reasons for performing study: Water treadmill exercise is often incorporated into rehabilitation programmes for horses yet little is known about the biomechanical and physiological responses to water walking. Objectives: To establish whether stride frequency (SF) reached steady state as a result of 6 introductory water treadmill sessions and then to investigate the effect of increasing water height on SF, stride length (SL) and heart rate (HR). Methods: Nine horses with no previous experience of water treadmills completed 6 sessions of walking for between 15 and 30 min. Each horse was fitted with a leg mounted accelerometer to measure SF. The effect of session on SF was tested using univariate ANOVA. Eight horses completed 3 further sessions at each of the following water heights; proximal interphalangeal joint (PIP), carpus and ulna. SF, SL and HR at each water height were compared to a control (hoof height) using univariate ANOVA. Results: When SF during introductory sessions 4–6 were compared, there was no significant effect of session on SF (P>0.05). In the second part of the experiment, SF was 0.57 ± 0.03 strides/s at control, 0.54 ± 0.03 strides/s at the PIP joint, 0.51 ± 0.02 strides/s at the carpus and 0.52 ± 0.03 strides/s at the ulna. Stride frequency at carpal and ulna height was significantly lower than at control (P<0.05). Stride length was 1.53 ± 0.09 m for control, 1.63 ± 0.10 m at the PIP joint, 1.71 ± 0.08 m at the carpus and 1.68 ± 0.10 m at the ulna. Stride length at carpal and ulna height was significantly greater than control (P<0.05). There was no significant difference between HR during control and any other water height (P>0.05). Conclusion: Horses reached steady state gait within the first 6 sessions of water treadmill exercise. Walking in water at the level of the carpus or ulna resulted in a lower SF compared to walking in water at hoof height.

    AB - Reasons for performing study: Water treadmill exercise is often incorporated into rehabilitation programmes for horses yet little is known about the biomechanical and physiological responses to water walking. Objectives: To establish whether stride frequency (SF) reached steady state as a result of 6 introductory water treadmill sessions and then to investigate the effect of increasing water height on SF, stride length (SL) and heart rate (HR). Methods: Nine horses with no previous experience of water treadmills completed 6 sessions of walking for between 15 and 30 min. Each horse was fitted with a leg mounted accelerometer to measure SF. The effect of session on SF was tested using univariate ANOVA. Eight horses completed 3 further sessions at each of the following water heights; proximal interphalangeal joint (PIP), carpus and ulna. SF, SL and HR at each water height were compared to a control (hoof height) using univariate ANOVA. Results: When SF during introductory sessions 4–6 were compared, there was no significant effect of session on SF (P>0.05). In the second part of the experiment, SF was 0.57 ± 0.03 strides/s at control, 0.54 ± 0.03 strides/s at the PIP joint, 0.51 ± 0.02 strides/s at the carpus and 0.52 ± 0.03 strides/s at the ulna. Stride frequency at carpal and ulna height was significantly lower than at control (P<0.05). Stride length was 1.53 ± 0.09 m for control, 1.63 ± 0.10 m at the PIP joint, 1.71 ± 0.08 m at the carpus and 1.68 ± 0.10 m at the ulna. Stride length at carpal and ulna height was significantly greater than control (P<0.05). There was no significant difference between HR during control and any other water height (P>0.05). Conclusion: Horses reached steady state gait within the first 6 sessions of water treadmill exercise. Walking in water at the level of the carpus or ulna resulted in a lower SF compared to walking in water at hoof height.

    U2 - 10.1111/j.2042-3306.2010.00194.x

    DO - 10.1111/j.2042-3306.2010.00194.x

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    EP - 664

    BT - Equine Veterinary Journal

    PB - Wiley-Blackwell

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